September 29, 2017
Shadi Ashnai, Manager, Image Processing
Markus van Almsick, Consultant, Algorithms R&D

Microscopes were invented almost four hundred years ago. But today, there’s a revolution in microscopy (as in so many other fields) associated with computation. We’ve been working hard to make the Wolfram Language a definitive platform for the emerging field of computational microscopy.

It all starts with getting an image of some kind—whether from a light or x-ray microscope, transmission electron microscope (TEM), confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM), two-photon excitation or a scanning electron microscope (SEM), as well as many more. You can then proceed to enhance images, reconstruct objects and perform measurements, detection, recognition and classification. At last month’s Microscopy & Microanalysis conference, we showed various examples of this pipeline, starting with a Zeiss microscope and a ToupTek digital camera.

Microanalysis tools

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September 7, 2017 — Greg Hurst, Wolfram|Alpha Math Content Manager

See what is new in step-by-step solutions

In our continued efforts to make it easier for students to learn and understand math and science concepts, the Wolfram|Alpha team has been hard at work this summer expanding our step-by-step solutions. Since the school year is just beginning, we’re excited to announce some new features.

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July 25, 2017
Roger Germundsson, Director of Research & Development
Jan Brugård, CEO, Wolfram MathCore
Patrik Ekenberg, Applications Engineer, Wolfram MathCore

New in SystemModeler

Our goal with SystemModeler is to provide a state-of-the-art environment for modeling, simulation—and analytics—that leverages the Wolfram technology stack and builds on the Modelica standard for systems description (that we helped to develop).

SystemModeler is routinely used by the world’s engineering organizations on some of the world’s most complex engineering systems—as well as in fields such as life sciences and social science. We’ve been pursuing the development of what is now SystemModeler for more than 15 years, adding more and more sophistication to the capabilities of the system. And today we’re pleased to announce the latest step forward: SystemModeler 5.

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June 6, 2017 — Keiko Hirayama, Wolfram|Alpha Developer, Wolfram|Alpha Scientific Content

Brain image and brain flow graph

As the next phase of Wolfram Research’s endeavor to make biology computable, we are happy to announce the recent release of neuroscience-related content.

The most central part of the human nervous system is the brain. It contains roughly 100 billion neurons that act together to process information, subdivided functionally and structurally into areas specialized for certain tasks. The brain’s anatomy, the characteristics of neurons and cognitive maps are used to represent some key aspects of the functional organization and processing abilities of our nervous system. Our new neuroscience content will give you a sneak peek into the amazing world of neuroscience with some facts about brains, neurons and cognition.

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May 25, 2017 — Devendra Kapadia, Kernel Developer, Algorithms R&D

Calculus mathematician timeline

Derivatives of functions play a fundamental role in calculus and its applications. In particular, they can be used to study the geometry of curves, solve optimization problems and formulate differential equations that provide mathematical models in areas such as physics, chemistry, biology and finance. The function D computes derivatives of various types in the Wolfram Language and is one of the most-used functions in the system. My aim in writing this post is to introduce you to the exciting new features for D in Version 11.1, starting with a brief history of derivatives.

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May 17, 2017 — Itai Seggev, Senior Kernel Developer, Algorithms R&D

WolframScript

Calling all command-line junkies: the new WolframScript is here!

Now you can evaluate Wolfram Language code, call deployed APIs and execute standalone scripts directly from your favorite command-line interface. WolframScript works like any other command-line utility, enabling flexible connections between the Wolfram System and other programs and I/O.

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March 28, 2017 — Markus Dahl, Applications Engineer, SystemModeler (MathCore)

SystemModeler OPCUA Industry 4.0

Background

Industry 4.0, the fourth industrial revolution of cyber-physical systems, is on the way! With it come sensors and boards that are much cheaper than they used to be. All of these components are connected through some kind of network or cloud so that they are able to talk to each other. This is where the OPC Unified Architecture (OPC UA) comes in. OPC UA is a machine-to-machine communication protocol for industrial automation. It is designed to be the successor to the older OPC Classic protocol that is bound to the Microsoft-only process exchange COM/DCOM (if you are interested in the OPCClassic library for Wolfram SystemModeler, you can find it here).

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November 16, 2016 — John Fultz, Director of User Interface Technology

UPDATE:

Wolfram Player for iOS is out of beta! You can download it from the App Store today. Learn more in this blog post.

Wolfram Player for iOS logo

It’s been a long road. To some degree, we’ve been working on a Wolfram notebook front end for iOS for about six years now. And in the process, we’ve learned a lot about notebook front ends, a thing we already knew a lot about. Let’s rewind the tape a bit and review.

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October 14, 2016 — Carlo Barbieri, Applied Research Group

Making web forms should be dead simple. That has been one of our goals at Wolfram Research since the release of the Wolfram Cloud. We’ve made smart input fields, powered by Wolfram|Alpha technology, that understand almost anything users type. We’ve designed FormFunction and APIFunction so that you can build forms and APIs with the same readable syntax. And now with the newest version of the Wolfram Language, you can build interactive web forms with dynamic branching and control flow using the Ask family of functions.

Would you like to learn how to build web forms with Ask?

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September 23, 2016 — Carlo Giacometti, Kernel Developer, Algorithms R&D

I have always liked listening to music. In high school, I started wondering how it is that music seems to be so universally pleasing, and how it differs from other kinds of sounds and noises. I started learning to play guitar, and later at the University of Trieste, I learned about acoustics and signal processing. I picked up the guitar in high school, but once I began learning to program, the idea of being able to create and process any sound using a computer was liberating. I didn’t need to buy expensive and esoteric gear; I just needed to write some (or a lot!) of code. There are many programming languages that focus on music and sound, but complex operations (such as sampling a number from a special distribution, or the simulation of random processes) often require a lot of effort. That’s why the audio capabilities in the Wolfram Language are special: the ability to deal with audio objects is combined with all the knowledge and computational power of the Wolfram Language!

First, we needed a brand-new atomic object in the language: the Audio object.

Import["http://exampledata.wolfram.com/bach.mp3"]

Play Audio

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