Wolfram Computation Meets Knowledge

Mathematica News

Announcements & Events

New in 13: Trees

Two years ago we released Version 12.0 of the Wolfram Language. Here are the updates in trees since then, including the latest features in 13.0. The contents of this post are compiled from Stephen Wolfram's Release Announcements for 12.1, 12.2, 12.3 and 13.0.

 

Trees! (May 2021)

Based on the number of new built-in functions the clear winner for the largest new framework in Version 12.3 is the one for trees. We’ve been able to handle trees as a special case of graphs for more than a decade (and of course all symbolic expressions in the Wolfram Language are ultimately represented as trees). But in Version 12.3 we’re introducing trees as first-class objects in the system.
Announcements & Events

New in 13: Symbolic & Numeric Computation

Math is big, and math is important. And for the Wolfram Language (which also means for Mathematica) we’re always pushing the frontiers of what’s computable in math.

One long-term story has to do with special functions. Back in Version 1.0 we already had 70 special functions.

Announcements & Events

New in 13: Notebook Interfaces

An important feature of Wolfram Notebooks is that they’re set up to operate both on the desktop and in the cloud. And even between versions of Wolfram Language there’s lots of continued enhancement in the way notebooks work in the cloud. But in Version 12.2 there’s been some particular streamlining of the interface for notebooks between desktop and cloud.

Announcements & Events

Launching Version 13.0 of Wolfram Language + Mathematica

The March of Innovation Continues

Just a few weeks ago it was 1/3 of a century since Mathematica 1.0 was released. Today I’m excited to announce the latest results of our long-running R&D pipeline: Version 13 of Wolfram Language and Mathematica. (Yes, the 1, 3 theme—complete with the fact that it’s the 13th of the month today—is amusing, if coincidental.)

It’s 207 days—or a little over 6 months—since we released Version 12.3. And I’m pleased to say that in that short time an impressive amount of R&D has come to fruition: not only a total of 117 completely new functions, but also many hundreds of updated and upgraded functions, several thousand bug fixes and small enhancements, and a host of new ideas to make the system ever easier and smoother to use.

Every day, every week, every month for the past third of a century we’ve been pushing hard to add more to the vast integrated framework that is Mathematica and the Wolfram Language. And now we can see the results of all those individual ideas and projects and pieces of work: a steady drumbeat of innovation sustained now over the course of more than a third of a century:

&#10005


Current Events & History

Celebrating a Third of a Century of Mathematica, and Looking Forward

Celebrating a Third of a Century of Mathematica, and Looking Forward

Mathematica 1.0 was launched on June 23, 1988. So (depending a little on how you do the computation) today is its one-third-century anniversary. And it’s wonderful to see how the tower of ideas and technology that we’ve worked so hard on for so long has grown in that third of a century—and how tall it’s become and how rapidly it still goes on growing.

In the past few years, I’ve come to have an ever-greater appreciation for just how unique what we’ve ended up building is, and just how fortunate our original choices of foundations and principles were. And even after a third of a century, what we have still seems like an artifact from the future—indeed ever more so with each passing year as it continues to grow and develop.

In the long view of intellectual history, this past one-third century will be seen as the time when the computational paradigm first took serious root, and when all its implications for “computational X” began to grow. And personally I feel very fortunate to have lived at the right time in history to have been able to be deeply involved with this and for what we have built to have made such a contribution to it.

Announcements & Events

Launching Version 12.3 of Wolfram Language & Mathematica

Look What We Made in Five Months!

It’s hard to believe we’ve been doing this for 35 years, building a taller and taller tower of ideas and technology that allow us to reach ever further. In earlier times we used to release the results of efforts only every few years. But in recent times we’ve started doing incremental (“.1”) releases that deliver our latest R&D achievements—both fully fleshed out, and partly as “coming attractions”—much more frequently.

We released Version 12.2 on December 16, 2020. And today, just five months later, we’re releasing Version 12.3. There are some breakthroughs and major new directions in 12.3. But much of what’s in 12.3 is just about making Wolfram Language and Mathematica better, smoother and more convenient to use. Things are faster. More “But what about ___?” cases are handled. Big frameworks are more completely filled out. And there are lots of new conveniences.

There are also the first pieces of what will become large-scale structures in the future. Early functions—already highly useful in their own right—that will in future releases be pieces of major systemwide frameworks.

Announcements & Events

Launching Version 12.2 of Wolfram Language & Mathematica: 228 New Functions and Much More…

Yet Bigger than Ever Before

When we released Version 12.1 in March of this year, I was pleased to be able to say that with its 182 new functions it was the biggest .1 release we’d ever had. But just nine months later, we’ve got an even bigger .1 release! Version 12.2, launching today, has 228 completely new functions!

Announcements & Events

What’s New with the Wolfram Documentation Center

The Wolfram Language is the culmination of decades of effort, supporting all our products. One reason the Wolfram Language is so easy to use is the Wolfram Language & System Documentation Center—unique in that it contains reference information along with tens of thousands of examples that can be edited and run in place (or quickly copied from the web to your notebook).

We recently released Version 12.1 of the Wolfram Language, and with it, a number of new documentation features and page types. With every release, you’ll find an increasing scope of functionality, examples and use cases documented for different fields and applications, presented with an intuitive, user-friendly design.