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Education & Academic

Wolfram|Alpha Pro Teaches Step-by-Step Arithmetic for All Grade Levels

In grade school, long arithmetic is considered a foundational math skill. In the past several decades in the United States, long arithmetic has traditionally been introduced between first and fifth grade, and remains crucial for students of all ages. The Common Core State Standards for mathematics indicate that first-grade students should learn how to add “a two-digit number and a one-digit number.” By second grade, students “add and subtract within 1000” and, in particular, “relate the strategy to a written method.” In third grade, multiplication by powers of 10 is introduced, and by fourth grade students are tasked to “use place value understanding and properties of operations to perform multi-digit arithmetic,” including multiplication and division. A fifth grader will not only be expected to “fluently multiply multi-digit whole numbers using the standard algorithm,” but also “add, subtract, multiply, and divide decimals.”
Announcements & Events

New in 13: Geometric Computation

Two years ago we released Version 12.0 of the Wolfram Language. Here are the updates in geometric computation since then, including the latest features in 13.0. The contents of this post are compiled from Stephen Wolfram's Release Announcements for 12.1, 12.2, 12.3 and 13.0.

 

Euclidean Geometry Goes Interactive (December 2020)

One of the major advances in Version 12.0 was the introduction of a symbolic representation for Euclidean geometry: you specify a symbolic GeometricScene, giving a variety of objects and constraints, and the Wolfram Language can “solve” it, and draw a diagram of a random instance that satisfies the constraints. In Version 12.2 we’ve made this interactive, so you can move the points in the diagram around, and everything will (if possible) interactively be rearranged so as to maintain the constraints.

Here's a random instance of a simple geometric scene:

Announcements & Events

New in 13: Cloud & Webpage Construction

Two years ago we released Version 12.0 of the Wolfram Language. Here are the updates in cloud and webpage construction since then, including the latest features in 13.0. The contents of this post are compiled from Stephen Wolfram's Release Announcements for 12.1, 12.2, 12.3 and 13.0.

 

WSTPServer: A New Deployment of Wolfram Engine (December 2020)

Our long-term goal is to make the Wolfram Language and the computational intelligence it provides as ubiquitous as possible. And part of doing this is to set up the Wolfram Engine which implements the language so that it can be deployed in as broad a range of computational infrastructure settings as possible.

Wolfram Desktop—as well as classic Mathematica—primarily provides a notebook interface to the Wolfram Engine, running on a local desktop system. It's also possible to run Wolfram Engine directly—as a command-line program (e.g. through WolframScript)—on a local computer system. And, of course, one can run the Wolfram Engine in the cloud, either through the full Wolfram Cloud (public or private), or through more lightweight cloud and server offerings (both existing and forthcoming).
Announcements & Events

New in 13: Data & Function Repositories

Two years ago we released Version 12.0 of the Wolfram Language. Here are the updates to the Data and Function Repositories since then, including the latest features in 13.0. The contents of this post are compiled from Stephen Wolfram's Release Announcements for 12.1, 12.2, 12.3 and 13.0.

 

Making the Data Repository Easy (March 2020)

We launched the Wolfram Function Repository in June 2019, and there are already 1146 functions published in it. One of the innovations in the Function Repository is a very streamlined process for submitting new functions, applicable both for the public Function Repository, and for individual deployment on a single machine, or in the cloud.
Announcements & Events

New in 13: Molecules & Biomolecular Sequences

Two years ago we released Version 12.0 of the Wolfram Language. Here are the updates in molecules and biomolecular sequences since then, including the latest features in 13.0. The contents of this post are compiled from Stephen Wolfram's Release Announcements for 12.1, 12.2, 12.3 and 13.0.

 

What Is That Molecule? Advances in Chemical Computation (March 2020)

You have an image of a molecular structure diagram, say from a paper. But how can you get the molecule it represents in a computable form? Well, with Version 12.1 all you need do is use MoleculeRecognize:
Announcements & Events

New in 13: Trees

Two years ago we released Version 12.0 of the Wolfram Language. Here are the updates in trees since then, including the latest features in 13.0. The contents of this post are compiled from Stephen Wolfram's Release Announcements for 12.1, 12.2, 12.3 and 13.0.

 

Trees! (May 2021)

Based on the number of new built-in functions the clear winner for the largest new framework in Version 12.3 is the one for trees. We’ve been able to handle trees as a special case of graphs for more than a decade (and of course all symbolic expressions in the Wolfram Language are ultimately represented as trees). But in Version 12.3 we’re introducing trees as first-class objects in the system.
Education & Academic

New in 13: Cryptography, Blockchains & NFTs

Two years ago we released Version 12.0 of the Wolfram Language. Here are the updates in cryptography, blockchains and NFTs since then, including the latest features in 13.0. The contents of this post are compiled from Stephen Wolfram's Release Announcements for 12.1, 12.2, 12.3 and 13.0.

 

Cryptography & Security (December 2020)

One of the things we want to do with Wolfram Language is to make it as easy as possible to connect with pretty much any external system. And in modern times an important part of that is being able to conveniently handle cryptographic protocols. And ever since we started introducing cryptography directly into the Wolfram Language five years ago, I’ve been surprised at just how much the symbolic character of the Wolfram Language has allowed us to clarify and streamline things to do with cryptography.
Announcements & Events

New in 13: Symbolic & Numeric Computation

Math is big, and math is important. And for the Wolfram Language (which also means for Mathematica) we’re always pushing the frontiers of what’s computable in math.

One long-term story has to do with special functions. Back in Version 1.0 we already had 70 special functions.