Wolfram Computation Meets Knowledge

Mathematica Q&A

Academics

Training Webinars: New in the Wolfram Language and Mathematica 11

3D printing. Audio. Machine learning. Neural networks. There are 555 completely new functions, major new areas of functionality and a vast deepening of core capabilities in Version 11 of the Wolfram Language and Mathematica. Continuing a three-decade tradition of aggressive innovation, Version 11 is filled to the brim with cutting-edge technology, and we're excited to share with you how to put all these new features to use. Join us for a special two-part webinar event, New in the Wolfram Language and Mathematica Version 11, on August 23, 2016, from 2--3:30pm EDT (6--7:30pm GMT) and August 30, 2016, from 2--4pm EDT (6--8pm GMT). Take the opportunity to explore the new features in the Wolfram Language and Mathematica with experts at Wolfram Research, then engage in interactive Q&A with the developers after the presentations.
Products

Mathematica Q&A Series: CDF Embedding in a Nutshell

Got questions about Mathematica? The Wolfram Blog has answers! We'll regularly answer selected questions from users around the web. You can submit your question directly to the Q&A Team. This week's question comes from Tom, a teacher who wants to post his lessons online: How can I use CDF to include Mathematica content on web pages? Read below or watch this screencast for the answer (we recommend viewing it in full-screen mode): We're being asked this question more and more, and I am really glad to see how quickly the Computable Document Format (CDF) is being adopted. Whether you want to deliver your CDF content on your website or blog or as a desktop application, Mathematica 8.0.4 makes it quick and easy with a new CDF Web Deployment Wizard.
Products

Mathematica Q&A Series: Converting to Conventional Mathematical Typesetting

Got questions about Mathematica? The Wolfram Blog has answers! We'll regularly answer selected questions from users around the web. You can submit your question directly to the Q&A Team. This week's question comes from Jee: How can I transform the output of partial differentiation such as f(1, 0)[x, y] to the mathematical form ? Read below or watch this screencast for the answer (we recommend viewing it in full-screen mode): We will assume that the reader is already familiar with the basics of differentiation in Mathematica. To quickly catch up with the topic, one should read the recent Q&A blog post "Three Functions for Computing Derivatives”.
Products

Mathematica Q&A Series: Surprises in Differentiation and Integration

Got questions about Mathematica? The Wolfram Blog has answers! We'll regularly answer selected questions from users around the web. You can submit your question directly to the Q&A Team. This week's question comes from Kutha, a math lecturer: Why doesn't differentiating after integrating always return the original function? Read below or watch this screencast for the answer (we recommend viewing it in full-screen mode): The derivative of a definite integral with respect to its upper bound (with a constant lower bound) is equal to the integrand:
Products

Mathematica Q&A Series: Generating Random Numbers

Got questions about Mathematica? The Wolfram Blog has answers! We'll regularly answer selected questions from users around the web. You can submit your question directly to the Q&A Team. This week's question comes from Peter, a secondary school teacher: How can I generate random integers between -10 and 10, but excluding 0? Read below or watch this screencast for the answer (we recommend viewing it in full-screen mode):
Products

Mathematica Q&A: Creating Movie Files

Got questions about Mathematica? The Wolfram Blog has answers! We'll regularly answer selected questions from users around the web. You can submit your question directly to the Q&A Team using this form. Here is this week's question: How can I create and export movies and animations in Mathematica? This is something we do often—just about every movie or animation on the Wolfram Blog is created in Mathematica.
Products

Mathematica Q&A: Computing Freight-Container Check Digits

Got questions about Mathematica? The Wolfram Blog has answers! We'll regularly answer selected questions from users around the web. You can submit your question directly to the Q&A Team using this form. This week's question comes from Adri, an engineer: How can I calculate the check digit in freight container codes like MSKU3881107? We had to start with some quick research for this question: it turns out that freight (shipping) container identification is covered by the ISO 6346 standard (Wikipedia). Under ISO 6346, each container is labeled with an 11-digit code (four letters + seven numerals) in which the last digit is a "check" digit that is computed from the other 10 digits, according to a fixed rule. For example, in MSKU3881107, the final “7” is the check digit. The rule specified by ISO 6346 for computing the check digit is designed so most accidental changes or misreadings of a single digit in a code will also change the check digit. This means you can use the check digit to catch most such errors; whenever you see a code, you calculate the check digit yourself and see if it matches up with the one in the code.
Products

Mathematica Q&A: Three Functions for Computing Derivatives

Got questions about Mathematica? The Wolfram Blog has answers! We'll regularly answer selected questions from users around the web. You can submit your question directly to the Q&A Team using this form. This week's question comes from Bashir, a student: What are the different functions for computing derivatives in Mathematica? The main function for computing derivatives in Mathematica is D, which computes the familiar partial derivative of an expression with respect to a variable: D supports generalizations including multiple derivatives and derivatives with respect to multiple variables, such as differentiating twice with respect to x, then once with respect to y: And vector and tensor derivatives, such as the gradient: