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Education & Academic

A New Method of Bell Ringing Using Mathematica to Discover Wolf Wrap

English bell ringing (called change ringing) has many connections to mathematics, notably to group theory and Hamiltonian cycles. My wife, Joan Hutchinson, is an ardent bell ringer (having rung in both England and North America), and I knew the basics of this ancient craft. A recent puzzle book by Mark Davies [1] inspired me to bring Mathematica’s integer-linear programming (ILP) capabilities to bear, but I wanted to go beyond puzzles and develop a new ringing method that would be of interest to the bell-ringing community.
Current Events & History

Celebrating a Third of a Century of Mathematica, and Looking Forward

Celebrating a Third of a Century of Mathematica, and Looking Forward

Mathematica 1.0 was launched on June 23, 1988. So (depending a little on how you do the computation) today is its one-third-century anniversary. And it’s wonderful to see how the tower of ideas and technology that we’ve worked so hard on for so long has grown in that third of a century—and how tall it’s become and how rapidly it still goes on growing.

In the past few years, I’ve come to have an ever-greater appreciation for just how unique what we’ve ended up building is, and just how fortunate our original choices of foundations and principles were. And even after a third of a century, what we have still seems like an artifact from the future—indeed ever more so with each passing year as it continues to grow and develop.

In the long view of intellectual history, this past one-third century will be seen as the time when the computational paradigm first took serious root, and when all its implications for “computational X” began to grow. And personally I feel very fortunate to have lived at the right time in history to have been able to be deeply involved with this and for what we have built to have made such a contribution to it.

Education & Academic

A New Way to Ask Wolfram|Alpha Questions with Math Input

We are excited to talk about a feature we released this summer that we call Math Input. We’ve had many requests to add this feature to the site, and after a lot of hard work from multiple teams, we’re ready to share it with you. Head over to Wolfram|Alpha to see it for yourself:
Current Events & History

John Snow & the Birth of Epidemiology Data Analysis & Visualization

In 1854, there was a major cholera outbreak in Soho, a neighborhood in London that Judith Summers described as full of “cow-sheds, animal droppings, slaughterhouses, grease-boiling dens and primitive, decaying sewers.” At the time, the cause of the outbreak was unknown because germ theory was still being developed and disease transmission was not well understood. Miasma theory was the dominant hypothesis, and it proposed that diseases, including cholera and the plague, were spread by foul gasses emitted from decomposing organic matter.
Education & Academic

Using Neural Networks to Boost Student Learning in Chemistry

I attended the Wolfram Neural Networks Boot Camp 2020, and that inspired me to incorporate elements of data science and machine learning in my course. The helper functions for machine learning make it quite easy to experiment and introduce such applications to students. We chose to perform image recognition and classification problems that are routinely used to initiate the topics of both neural networks and machine learning.