April 16, 2019 — Stephen Wolfram

The Road to Version 12

Today we’re releasing Version 12 of Wolfram Language (and Mathematica) on desktop platforms, and in the Wolfram Cloud. We released Version 11.0 in August 2016, 11.1 in March 2017, 11.2 in September 2017 and 11.3 in March 2018. It’s a big jump from Version 11.3 to Version 12.0. Altogether there are 278 completely new functions, in perhaps 103 areas, together with thousands of different updates across the system:

Version 12 launches today

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April 11, 2019 — Swede White, Public Relations Manager

Fishackathon

Every year, the U.S. Department of State sponsors a worldwide competition called Fishackathon. Its goal is to protect life in our waters by creating technological solutions to help solve problems related to fishing.

The first global competition was held in 2014 and has been growing massively every year. In 2018 the winning entry came from a five-person team from Boston, after competing against 45,000 people in 65 other cities spread across 5 continents. The participants comprised programmers, web and graphic designers, oceanographers and biologists, mathematicians, engineers and students who all worked tirelessly over the course of two days.

To find out more about the winning entry for Fishackathon in 2018 and how the Wolfram Language has helped make the seas safer, we sat down with Michael Sollami to learn more about him and his team’s solution to that year’s challenge.

Wolfram Language at Fishackathon

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April 4, 2019 — Dan McDonald, Lead Developer, Synthetic Geometry Project

RandomInstance

Version 12 of the Wolfram Language introduces the functions GeometricScene, RandomInstance and FindGeometricConjectures for representing, drawing and reasoning about problems in plane geometry. In particular, abstract scene descriptions can be automatically supplied with coordinate values to produce diagrams satisfying the conditions of the scene. Let’s apply this functionality to some of the articles and problems about geometry appearing in the issues of The American Mathematical Monthly from February and March of 2019.

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April 2, 2019 — Jon McLoone, Director, Technical Communication & Strategy

Over the years, I have been asked many times about my opinions on free and open-source software. Sometimes the questions are driven by comparison to some promising or newly fashionable open-source project, sometimes by comparison to a stagnating open-source project and sometimes by the belief that Wolfram technology would be better if it were open source.

At the risk of provoking the fundamentalist end of the open-source community, I thought I would share some of my views in this blog. While there are counterexamples to most of what I have to say, not every point applies to every project, and I am somewhat glossing over the different kinds of “free” and “open,” I hope I have crystallized some key points.

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March 29, 2019 — Michael Trott, Chief Scientist

Introduction

In the so-called “new SI,” the updated version of the International System of Units that will define the seven base units (second, meter, kilogram, ampere, kelvin, mole and candela) and that goes into effect May 20 of 2019, all SI units will be definitionally based on exact values of fundamental constants of physics. And as a result, all the named units of the SI (newton, volt, ohm, pascal, etc.) will ultimately be expressible through fundamental constants. (Finally, fundamental physics will be literally ruling our daily life 😁.)

Here is how things will change from the evening of Monday, May 20, to the morning of Tuesday, May 21, of this year.

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March 21, 2019 — Chapin Langenheim, Editorial Project Coordinator, Web and Product Release Management

Starry night over water

Over the past 16 weeks, Wolfram Community has gained over 1,000 new members—surpassing 21,000 members total! We’ve also seen more activity, with 800,000 pageviews and 160,000 new readers in that time period. We enjoy seeing the interesting and unique projects Wolfram Language users come up with and are excited to share some of the posts that make Wolfram Community a favorite platform for sharing, socializing and networking.

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March 14, 2019 — Shenghui Yang, Developer, Wolfram|Alpha Localization Systems

Spikey commemorative coins with the Wolfram Language

I approached my friend Frederick Wu and suggested that we should make a physical Wolfram Spikey Coin (not to be confused with a Wolfram Blockchain Token!) for the celebration of the 30th anniversary of Mathematica. Frederick is a long-term Mathematica user and coin collector, and together, we challenged ourselves to design our own commemorative coin for such a special event.

The iconic Spikey is a life-long companion of Mathematica, coined (no pun intended) in 1988 with the release of Version 1. Now, we’ve reached a time in which Wolfram technologies and different 3D printing processes happily marry together to make this project possible!

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March 7, 2019 — Ed Pegg Jr, Editor, Wolfram Demonstrations Project

The sqrt(χ) substitution tiling fractal

Similar Triangle Dissections

Version 12 of the Wolfram Language introduces solvers for geometry problems. The documentation for the new function GeometricScene has a neat example showing the following piece of code, with GeometricAssertion calling for seven similar triangles:

Sqrt(ρ) substitution tiling
&#10005

o=Sequence[Opacity[.9],EdgeForm[Black]];plasticDissection=RandomInstance[GeometricScene[{a,b,c,d,e,f,g},{
a=={1,0},e=={0,0},Line[{a,e,d,c}],
p0==Polygon[{a,b,c}],
p1==Style[Polygon[{b,d,c}],Orange,o],
p2==Style[Polygon[{d,f,e}],Yellow,o],
p3==Style[Polygon[{b,f,d}],Blue,o],
p4==Style[Polygon[{g,f,b}],Green,o],
p5==Style[Polygon[{e,g,f}],Magenta,o],
p6==Style[Polygon[{a,e,g}],Purple,o],
GeometricAssertion[{p0,p1,p2,p3,p4,p5,p6},"Similar"]}],RandomSeeding->28]

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February 26, 2019 — Christopher Carlson, Senior User Interface Developer, User Interfaces

Every year at the Wolfram Technology Conference, attendees take part in the One-Liner Competition, a contest to see who can do the most astounding things with 128 characters of Wolfram Language code. Wolfram employees are not allowed to compete out of fairness to our conference visitors, but nevertheless every year I get submissions and requests to submit from my colleagues that I have to reject. To provide an outlet for their eagerness to show how cool the software is that they develop, this year we organized the first internal One-Liner Competition.

Abstract Art

We awarded first-, second- and third-place prizes as well as six honorable mentions and one dishonorable mention. And the winners are…

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February 14, 2019 — Toni Schindler, Consultant, Wolfram|Alpha Scientific Content

Imagine you could import any website to obtain meaningful data for further processing, like creating a diagram, highlighting places on a map or integrating with other data sources. What if you could query data on the web knowing only one simple query language? That’s the vision of the semantic web. The semantic web is based on standards like the Resource Description Framework (RDF) and SPARQL (a query language for RDF). The upcoming release of Version 12 of the Wolfram Language introduces experimental support for interacting with the semantic web: you will be able to Import and Export a variety of RDF data formats as well as query remote SPARQL endpoints and in-memory data using either a query string or a symbolic representation of SPARQL.

Computational Musicology Using Wikidata and MusicBrainz

Image Map

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