October 20, 2020 — Christopher Carlson, Senior User Interface Developer, User Interfaces

Although this year’s Wolfram Technology Conference was virtual, that didn’t stop us from running the ninth annual One-Liner Competition, where attendees vie to produce the most amazing results they can with 128 or fewer characters of Wolfram Language code. Here are the winners, including an audio game, a hands-free 3D viewer and code that makes up countries.

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October 16, 2020 — Christian Pasquel, Manager, Wolfram Research South America Connectivity

Investigating the Ethereum Gold-Bug and Blockchain in the Wolfram Language

Blockchain was integrated into the Wolfram Language in 2018 with the release of Version 11.3, featuring a set of functions that is constantly improved and expanded upon by our team. Currently supporting a seamless connection to the Bitcoin, Ethereum, ARK and bloxberg mainnets, testnets and devnets, Wolfram introduced to the distributed ledger technology (DLT) space its philosophy of injecting computational intelligence everywhere through Wolfram Blockchain Labs, with the mission of enabling blockchain-based commerce and business model innovation.

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October 6, 2020 — Jofre Espigule-Pons, Machine Learning

Earth has experienced five major extinctions since life first appeared almost four billion years ago. The sixth is happening right now; the current extinction rate is between one hundred and one thousand times greater than what it was before 1800.

Despite the alarming extinction rate, it’s easier than ever to document biodiversity with the help of the Wolfram Language. Using the monarch butterfly as an example, I will explore the new biodiversity data access functions in the Wolfram Function Repository and how they can help you join a community of thousands of citizen scientists from iNaturalist in preserving biodiversity.

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September 4, 2020 — Mads Bahrami, Community & Content Developer, Community Advancement

Wolfram Community Takes on Current Events: COVID-19 Data, Green Spaces, Homeschool Puzzles and More

This roundup of Wolfram Community contributions features several different functions and tools related to current times, from the global pandemic to sustainable spaces and homeschool puzzles. Read on to see just a few creative examples from some of our favorite Community members and Wolfram Language wizzes.

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August 25, 2020 — Bob Sandheinrich, Development Manager, Document & Media Systems

You Can’t Have a Function Repository without Having Some Fun

While programming in the Wolfram Language, I am able to quickly and easily get results—one of the best aspects of writing code in a high-level language. The Wolfram Language is so easy to use that I have the freedom to pursue ideas on a whim, even if I know those ideas may not accomplish anything great or work toward a larger goal. In most cases, within a few minutes I figure out if the idea is a dead end. I also figure out if I am on the path to creating something useful or, better yet, fun.

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August 18, 2020 — Jérôme Louradour, Machine Learning

Generative Adversarial Networks (GANs) in the Wolfram Language

A noteworthy achievement of artificial intelligence, since it is driven by artificial neural networks under the label deep learning, is the ability to create artistic works to generate images, text and sounds. At the core of this breakthrough is a basic method to train neural networks that was introduced by Ian Goodfellow in 2014 and was called by Yann LeCun “the most interesting idea in the last 10 years in machine learning”: generative adversarial networks (GANs). A GAN is a way to train a generative network that produces realistic-looking fake samples out of a latent seed, which can be some arbitrary data or random numbers sampled from a simple distribution. Let’s look at how to do so with some of the new capabilities developed for Mathematica Version 12.1.

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August 6, 2020 — Arnoud Buzing, Director of Quality and Release Management

Alice and Bob Play a Game of Cards

While catching up with my old friends Alice and Bob on Zoom a few days ago, I became intrigued by their recent card game hobby—and how they used the Wolfram Language to settle an argument. To figure out who gets to go first at the start of the game, they take one suit (spades) from a full deck, and each draws a card. Then, the person with the highest card value wins. Because they are using only one suit, there can be no ties. Simple, right?

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July 23, 2020 — Leonardo Laguna Ruiz, Software Engineer, SystemModeler

Digital Vintage Sound: Modeling Analog Synthesizers with the Wolfram Language and System Modeler

Have you ever thought about making your own musical instruments? What about making mathematical models of your instruments? Whether you’re someone looking for a cost-effective alternative, a minimalist with dreams of maximalist sounds or a Wolfram Language enthusiast curious about sound design, you can build a virtual version of a modular synthesizer using Wolfram System Modeler.

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June 2, 2020 — Paritosh Mokhasi, Kernel Developer, Algorithms R&D

Using Integer Optimization to Build and Solve Sudoku Games with the Wolfram Language

Sudoku is a popular game that pushes the player’s analytical, mathematical and mental abilities. Solving sudoku problems has long been discussed on Wolfram Community, and there has been some fantastic code presented to solve sudoku problems. To add to that discussion, I will demonstrate several features that are new to Mathematica Version 12.1, including how this game can be solved as an integer optimization problem using the function LinearOptimization, as well as how you can generate new sudoku games.

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December 23, 2019 — Jon McLoone, Director, Technical Communication & Strategy

For many of us, programming represents leisure time just as much as work. Here at Wolfram, we have an incredibly creative group with a wide variety of hobbies, on the screen and off—including textile arts like cross-stitch. So when my colleague Jay suggested that I create a cross-stitch program using the Wolfram Language, I replied with “Challenge accepted!” Jay was looking for a simple way to generate a cross-stitch pattern from a photograph—or really any image—with the colors corresponding to the DMC thread ID numbers. We both knew that the image-processing capabilities of the Wolfram Language would make this an easy task, but incorporating the DMC thread catalog seemed a more interesting challenge. Armed with both computer and (virtual) thread, I set out on my quest to create the perfect cross-stitch pattern generator.

Crafty Computation: Cross-Stitch Patterns with the Wolfram Language

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