Wolfram Computation Meets Knowledge

Recreational Computation

Current Events & History

Cheers! A Computational Exploration of Alcoholic Beverages with the Wolfram Language

For 10 thousand years, humans have been using fermentation to produce beverages for pleasure, rituals and healing. In ancient Greece, honey was fermented to produce mead. Today, popular sources of beverage fermentation are grains, grapes, berries and rice. The science of fermentation—known as zymology (or zymurgy)—is a fascinating blend of chemistry, biology, history and geography. The Wolfram Language now brings a new dimension to the study of alcoholic beverages through an extensive dataset ready to be explored and analyzed.
Computation & Analysis

Animating Surfaces in the Wolfram Language Bringing Geometric Design to Life

Around the beginning of the first COVID-19-related lockdown in Austria, I was confronted with the problem of keeping my motivation up. From 2012–2016, my main tool for creating several Wolfram Demonstrations in 3D was Mathematica. Now, in addition to the Wolfram Language, Blender offered the possibility for physically based rendering (PBR) and high dynamic range (HDR) lighting and rendering. So I decided to go forward with 4K videos from animations done in Blender.
Education & Academic

Liberal Arts, Meet Computation A Wolfram Community Introduction

We can guess if you’re reading the Wolfram Blog that you’re probably a Wolfram Language user, whether as a recreational programmer, a physics professor or a high-powered data scientist. And let’s be honest about another thing: if you’re using it to solve algebraic integrals or analyze SARS-CoV-2 genetic sequences or some other complex subject, you’re likely a big-brained person. I mean, you’re investigating the very nature of the universe in all its facets, right?
Computation & Analysis

Bowl a Strike with Wolfram System Modeler

Explore the contents of this article with a free Wolfram System Modeler trial. Bowling is a simple game that consists of a ball, 10 pins and a lane. You take the ball, come to the starting line, aim between pins 1 and 3 and throw the ball. You instinctively assume that the ball and the lane are perfect and expect the ball to go straight where you aimed.