June 14, 2008 — Ed Pegg Jr, Editor, Wolfram Demonstrations Project

On June 14, 1777, the Continental Congress resolved that the flag of the United States would have 13 alternating red and white stripes, with the states represented as white stars on a blue field. The CountryData data paclet has information about this and many other flags, as can be seen in the “Country Flags and Descriptions” Demonstration.

Country Flags and Descriptions Demonstration

If you’d like to test your knowledge of national flags, there is also a “Country Flag Quiz” Demonstration that you may download for free. Both of these Wolfram Demonstrations show off the power of the CountryData paclet. For example, Mathematica can analyze all those flag descriptions.

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July 19, 2007 — Joshua Martell, Software Technology

An email went out on a mailing list here at Wolfram looking for someone interested in learning about doing 3D printing. I’d heard about these so-called “Santa Claus machines,” but had never seen one in action. They’re really quite interesting. You tell Santa what you want, and out it comes–a shiny new toy!

Now it’s not quite that simple, but you get the idea. The models that these printers create can’t be too delicate, or they’ll break. The kind of printer that I’m now most familiar with builds the model from the bottom up, constructing the object one layer at a time from plaster and water. A thin layer of plaster is deposited, then a binding agent sprays from basically an oversized ink-jet printer to harden the areas that form the object. Once the printer is done, you have to dust off the object and infuse it with a hardener so it’s less fragile.

But back to the story. Ed Pegg Jr–associate editor for MathWorld–was writing an article about 3D printing and wanted to know more about the process. The idea was to print a physical 3D model of the spikey, our company logo, at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, which is just a few blocks from our offices. (You can read about the development of the spikey here.)

This was the version we were working with:

Mathematica model of spikey

But how would we turn that image into something we could actually hold in our hands?

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May 8, 2007 — Michael Pilat, Software Technology

Well, Mathematica 6 has only been out a week, and I’m happy to announce that we’ve already released an update! What’s better, you probably already have it if you use Mathematica 6!

How is that possible?

After exploring the What’s New website, you might have noticed the page for Load-on-Demand Curated Data, which says our “efficient load-on-demand mechanism makes hundreds of gigabytes of carefully curated and continually updated data immediately available inside Mathematica for use in computations.”

We’ve done a lot of work to aggregate data in a variety of disciplines, from chemistry to graph theory, geography to linguistics. This data is collected from a broad range of sources, and processed both automatically and by knowledgeable experts here at Wolfram Research, with the goal of providing data that is consistent, computable, and accurate.

How is this data delivered to you? At first, you might guess it’s shipped along with the many other features of the product. But the box doesn’t have a dozen CDs in it and there’s only a single download from our online store. That’s because Mathematica itself automatically downloads the data it needs, when it needs it.

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