Kathy Bautista

Teacher Resources for Introducing Computational Thinking and Data Science

January 17, 2019 — Kathy Bautista, Senior Sales Initiatives Manager, Academic Sales

As many teachers make the transition back into classes after the holidays, quite a few have plans to update lessons to include segments that introduce data science concepts. Why, you ask?

According to a LinkedIn report published last week, the most promising job in the US in 2019 is data scientist. And if you search for the top “hard skills” needed for 2019, data science is often in the top 10.

Data science, applied computation, predictive analytics… no matter what you call it, in a nutshell it’s gathering insight from data through analysis and knowing what questions to ask to get the right answers. As technology continues to advance, the career landscape also continues to evolve with a greater emphasis on data—so data science has quickly become an essential skill that’s popping up in all sorts of careers, including engineering, business, astronomy, athletics, marketing, economics, farming, meteorology, urban planning, sociology and nursing.

Teacher Resources for Introducing Computational Thinking and Data Science

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Brian Wood

Deploying and Sharing: Web Scraping with the Wolfram Language, Part 3

January 10, 2019 — Brian Wood, Lead Technical Marketing Writer, Document and Media Systems

So far in this series, I’ve covered the process of extracting, cleaning and structuring data from a website. So what does one do with a structured dataset? Continuing with the Election Atlas data from the previous post, this final entry will talk about how to store your scraped data permanently and deploy results to the web for universal access and sharing.

Deploying and Sharing with the Wolfram Language

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Wolfram Blog Team

Trivial Pursuits: Applications and Diversions with the Wolfram Language

January 3, 2019 — Wolfram Blog Team

Mark Greenberg is a retired educator and contributor to the Tech-Based Teaching blog, which explores the intersections between computational thinking, edtech and learning. He recounts his experience adapting old game code using the Wolfram Language and deployment through the Wolfram Cloud.

Chicken Scratch is an academic trivia game that I originally coded about 20 years ago. At the time I was the Academic Decathlon coach of a large urban high school, and I needed a fun way for my students to remember thousands of factoids for the Academic Decathlon competitions. The game turned out to be beneficial to our team, and so popular that other teams asked to buy it from us. I refreshed the questions each year and continued holding Chicken Scratch tournaments at the next two schools I worked in.

Chicken Scratch

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Stephen Wolfram

The Story of Spikey

December 28, 2018 — Stephen Wolfram

Wolfram’s Spikey logo—a flattened rhombic hexecontahedron

Spikeys Everywhere

We call it “Spikey”, and in my life today, it’s everywhere:

Stephen Wolfram surrounded by Spikeys

It comes from a 3D object—a polyhedron that’s called a rhombic hexecontahedron:

3D rhombic hexecontahedron

But what is its story, and how did we come to adopt it as our symbol?

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Chapin Langenheim

’Tis the Season: Reflective Ornaments, Singing Trees & More from Wolfram Community

December 20, 2018 — Chapin Langenheim, Editorial Project Coordinator, Web and Product Release Management

Wolfram Community continues to grow with innovative projects from Wolfram technology aficionados—our total number of members having recently passed 20,000! Deck the halls with these shiny new examples of the content making our tech-oriented social network thrive, and be sure to post your own Wolfram technology–based projects as well.

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Posted in: Wolfram Community

Chapin Langenheim

New Books, New Possibilities: The Latest Additions to the Wolfram Bookshelf

December 18, 2018 — Chapin Langenheim, Editorial Project Coordinator, Web and Product Release Management

Check out these fresh picks from authors utilizing the Wolfram Language! Covering a range of topics from algebraic curves to reaction kinetics to finance policy, these books are excellent additions to the extensive list of publications showing what’s possible with Wolfram technologies.

A Numerical Approach to Real Algebraic Curves with the Wolfram Language, Schaum’s Outline of Mathematica and the Wolfram Language, Third Edition (Schaum’s Outlines) and Reaction Kinetics: Exercises, Programs and Theorems: Mathematica for Deterministic and Stochastic Kinetics

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Posted in: Books, Wolfram Language

Jesika Brooks

The Computational Classroom: Easy Ways to Introduce Computational Thinking into Your Lessons

December 13, 2018 — Jesika Brooks, Blog Editor - EduTech, Public Relations

A version of this post was originally published on the Tech-Based Teaching blog as “Computational Lesson-Planning: Easy Ways to Introduce Computational Thinking into Your Lessons.” Tech-Based Teaching explores the intersections between computational thinking, edtech and learning.

Sometimes a syllabus is set in stone. You’ve got to cover X, Y and Z, and no amount of reworking or shifting assignments around can change that. Other factors can play a role too: limited time, limited resources or even a bit of nervousness at trying something new.

But what if you’d like to introduce some new ideas into your lessons—ideas like digital citizenship or computational thinking? Introducing computational thinking to fields that are not traditionally part of STEM can sometimes be a challenge, so feel free to share this journey with your children’s teachers, friends and colleagues.

The computational classroom

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Tuseeta Banerjee

Deep Learning and Computer Vision: Converting Models for the Wolfram Neural Net Repository

December 6, 2018 — Tuseeta Banerjee, Research Scientist, Advanced Research Group

Julian Francis, a longtime user of the Wolfram Language, contacted us with a potential submission for the Wolfram Neural Net Repository. The Wolfram Neural Net Repository consists of models that researchers at Wolfram have either trained in house or converted from the original code source, curated, thoroughly tested and finally have rendered the output in a very rich computable knowledge format. Julian was our very first user to go through the process of converting and testing the nets.

We thought it would be interesting to interview him on the entire process of converting the models for the repository so that he could share his experiences and future plans to inspire others.

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Parik Kapadia

Interning at Wolfram: My Regeneration as a Theoretical Scientist

November 29, 2018 — Parik Kapadia, Intern, Algorithms R&D

How does it feel to be an intern at Wolfram?

Most undergraduate college students chase opportunities for internships in New York, Miami, Seattle and particularly San Francisco at very young but large high-tech companies like Uber, Pinterest, Quora, Expedia and similar internet companies. These companies offer the best salaries, perks, bosses, coworkers, catered lunches and other luxurious amenities available in such large cities. You would seldom hear about any of these people pursuing opportunities in small, lesser-known towns like Ames, Iowa, or Laramie, Wyoming—and Champaign, Illinois, where Wolfram Research is based, is one of those smaller towns.

Many students want to go into computer science, as it’s such a rapidly developing field. They especially want to work in those companies on the West Coast. If you’re in a different field, like natural science, you might think there’s nothing beyond on-campus research for work experience. At Wolfram Research, though, there is.

Working at Wolfram

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Brian Wood

Computation + Literature in High School: Doctoral-Level Digital Humanities

November 20, 2018 — Brian Wood, Lead Technical Marketing Writer, Document and Media Systems

Thanks to the Wolfram Language, English teacher Peter Nilsson is empowering his students with computational methods in literature, history, geography and a range of other non-STEM fields. Working with a group of other teachers at Deerfield Academy, he developed Distant Reading: an innovative course for introducing high-level digital humanities concepts to high-school students. Throughout the course, students learn in-demand coding skills and data science techniques while also finding creative ways to apply computational thinking to real-world topics that interest them.

In this video, Nilsson describes how the built-in knowledge, broad subject coverage and intuitive coding workflow of the Wolfram Language were crucial to the success of his course:

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