Lizzie Turner

Apply Now for the 15th Annual Wolfram Summer School

March 21, 2017 — Lizzie Turner, Program Manager, Advanced Research Group

Wolfram Summer School participants

This year’s Wolfram Summer School will be held at Bentley University in Waltham, Massachusetts, from June 18 to July 7, 2017.

Maybe you’re a researcher who wants to study the dynamics of galaxies with cellular automata. Perhaps you’re an innovator who wants to create a way to read time from pictures of analog clocks or build a new startup with products that use RFID (radio-frequency identification) to track objects. You might be an educator who wants to build an algebra feedback system or write a textbook that teaches designers how to disinvent the need for air conditioning. These projects show the diversity and creativity of some of our recent Summer School students. Does this sound like you? If so, we want you to join us this summer!

CONTINUE READING »

Posted in: Education

Stephen Wolfram

The R&D Pipeline Continues: Launching Version 11.1

March 16, 2017 — Stephen Wolfram

A Minor Release That’s Not Minor

I’m pleased to announce the release today of Version 11.1 of the Wolfram Language (and Mathematica). As of now, Version 11.1 is what’s running in the Wolfram Cloud—and desktop versions are available for immediate download for Mac, Windows and Linux.

What’s new in Version 11.1? Well, actually a remarkable amount. Here’s a summary:

Summary of new features

CONTINUE READING »


Jeffrey Bryant

Visualizing Anatomy

March 10, 2017 — Jeffrey Bryant, Scientific Information Group

Brain image

In Mathematica 10, we introduced support for anatomical structures in EntityValue, which included, among many other things, a “Graphics3D” property that returns a 3D model of the anatomical structure in question. We also styled the models and aligned them with the concepts in the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS).

CONTINUE READING »


Håkan Wettergren

How to Use Your Smartphone for Vibration Analysis, Part 1: The Wolfram Language

March 2, 2017 — Håkan Wettergren, Applications Engineer, SystemModeler (MathCore)

Until now, it has been difficult for the average engineer to perform simple vibration analysis. The initial cost for simple equipment, including software, may be several thousand dollars—and it is not unusual for advanced equipment and software to cost ten times as much. Normally, a vibration specialist starts an investigation with a hammer impact test. An accelerometer is mounted on a structure, and a special impact hammer is used to excite the structure at several locations in the simplest and most common form of hammer impact testing. The accelerometer and hammer-force signals are recorded. Modal analysis is then used to get a preliminary understanding of the behavior of the system. The minimum equipment requirements for such a test are an accelerometer, an impact hammer, amplifiers, a signal recorder and analysis software.

I’ve figured out how to use the Wolfram Language on my smartphone to sample and analyze machine vibration and noise, and to perform surprisingly good vibration analysis. I’ll show you how, and give you some simple Wolfram Language code to get you started.

CONTINUE READING »


Jeffrey Bryant
Paco Jain
Michael Trott

Hidden Figures: Modern Approaches to Orbit and Reentry Calculations

February 24, 2017
Jeffrey Bryant, Scientific Information Group
Paco Jain, Research Programmer, Wolfram|Alpha Scientific Content
Michael Trott, Chief Scientist

The movie Hidden Figures was released in theaters recently and has been getting good reviews. It also deals with an important time in US history, touching on a number of topics, including civil rights and the Space Race. The movie details the hidden story of Katherine Johnson and her coworkers (Dorothy Vaughan and Mary Jackson) at NASA during the Mercury missions and the United States’ early explorations into manned space flight. The movie focuses heavily on the dramatic civil rights struggle of African American women in NASA at the time, and these struggles are set against the number-crunching ability of Johnson and her coworkers. Computers were in their early days at this time, so Johnson and her team’s ability to perform complicated navigational orbital mechanics problems without the use of a computer provided an important sanity check against the early computer results.

Row[{Show[    Entity["Movie", "HiddenFigures::k39bj"][     EntityProperty["Movie", "Image"]], ImageSize -> 101], "  ",    Show[Entity["PopularCurve", "KatherineJohnsonCurve"][     EntityProperty["PopularCurve", "Image"]], Axes -> False,     Background -> LightBlue, ImageSize -> 120]}]

CONTINUE READING »

Posted in: History, Mathematics

Michael Trott

How Many Animals and Arp-imals Can One Find in a Random 3D Image?

February 23, 2017 — Michael Trott, Chief Scientist

And How Many Animals, Animal Heads, Human Faces, Aliens and Ghosts in Their 2D Projections?

Introduction

In my recent Wolfram Community post, “How many animals can one find in a random image?,” I looked into the pareidolia phenomenon from the viewpoints of pixel clusters in random (2D) black-and-white images. Here are some of the shapes I found, extracted, rotated, smoothed and colored from the connected black pixel clusters of a single 800×800 image of randomly chosen, uncorrelated black-and-white pixels.

arpimals

CONTINUE READING »


Michael Gammon

Analyzing and Translating an Alien Language: Arrival, Logograms and the Wolfram Language

January 31, 2017 — Michael Gammon, Blog Coordinator

Black and white logogram

If aliens actually visited Earth, world leaders would bring in a scientist to develop a process for understanding their language. So when director Denis Villeneuve began working on the science fiction movie Arrival, he and his team turned to real-life computer scientists Stephen and Christopher Wolfram to bring authentic science to the big screen. Christopher specifically was tasked with analyzing and writing code for a fictional nonlinear visual language. On January 31, he demonstrated the development process he went through in a livecoding event broadcast on LiveEdu.tv.

CONTINUE READING »


Jeremy Sykes

Meet the Authors of Hands-on Start to Wolfram Mathematica, Second Edition

January 24, 2017 — Jeremy Sykes, Publishing Assistant, Wolfram Media

Hands-on Start cover

Jeremy Sykes: To celebrate the release of Hands-on Start to Wolfram Mathematica and Programming with the Wolfram Language (HOS2), now in its second edition, I sat down with the authors. Working with Cliff, Kelvin and Michael as the book’s production manager has been an easy and engaging process. I’m thrilled to see the second edition in print, particularly now in its smaller, more conveniently sized format.

CONTINUE READING »


Jofre Espigule-Pons

Exploring a Boxing Legend’s Career with the Wolfram Language: Ali at 75

January 17, 2017 — Jofre Espigule-Pons, Consultant, Technical Communications and Strategy Group

Muhammad Ali (born Cassius Marcellus Clay Jr.; January 17, 1942–June 3, 2016) is considered one of the greatest heavyweight boxers in history, with a record of 56 wins and 5 losses. He remains the only three-time lineal heavyweight champion, so there’s no doubt why he is nicknamed “The Greatest.”

I used the Wolfram Language to create several visualizations to celebrate his work and gain some new insights into his life. Last June, I wrote a Wolfram Community post about Ali’s career. On what would have been The Greatest’s 75th birthday, I wanted to take a minute to explore the larger context of Ali’s career, from late-career boxing stats to poetry.

First, I created a PieChart showing Ali’s record:

bouts = <|"TKO" -> 21, "KO" -> 11, "UD" -> 18, "RTD" -> 5, "SD" -> 1,     "LUD" -> 2, "LSD" -> 2, "LRTD" -> 1|>; PieChart[bouts, ChartStyle -> 24,   ChartLabels ->    Placed[{Map[Style[#, Bold, FontSize -> 14] &, Values[bouts]],      Map[Style[#, FontFamily -> "Helvetica Neue", Bold,         FontSize -> 16] &, Keys[bouts]]}, {"RadialCenter",      "RadialCallout"}], PlotRange -> All,   SectorOrigin -> {Automatic, 1},  ChartLegends -> {"Technical Knockout", "Knockout",     "Unanimous Decision", "Retired", "Split-Decision",     "Lost - Unanimous Decision", "Lost - Split-Decision",     "Lost - Retired"},   PlotLabel ->    Style["Ali's Record", Bold, FontFamily -> "Helvetica Neue",     FontSize -> 22], ImageSize -> 410]
Ali's Record

CONTINUE READING »


Nick Lariviere

Automotive Reliability in the Wolfram Language

January 13, 2017 — Nick Lariviere, Kernel Developer, Core Mathematica Engineering

This post originally appeared on Wolfram Community, where the conversation about reliable cars continues. Be sure to check out that conversation and more—we can’t wait to see what you come up with!

For the past couple of years, I’ve been playing with, collecting and analyzing data from used car auctions in my free time with an automotive journalist named Steve Lang to try and get an idea of what the used car market looks like in terms of long-term vehicle reliability. I figured it was about time that I showed off some of the ways that the Wolfram Language has allowed us to parse through information on over one million vehicles (and counting).

Vehicle Class Quality Index Rating

CONTINUE READING »