Etienne Bernard

Building the Automated Data Scientist: The New Classify and Predict

October 10, 2017 — Etienne Bernard, Lead Architect, Advanced Research Group

Automated Data Science

Imagine a baker connecting a data science application to his database and asking it, “How many croissants are we going to sell next Sunday?” The application would simply answer, “According to your recorded data and other factors such as the predicted weather, there is a 90% chance that between 62 and 67 croissants will be sold.” The baker could then plan accordingly. This is an example of an automated data scientist, a system to which you could throw arbitrary data and get insights or predictions in return.

One key component in making this a reality is the ability to learn a predictive model without specifications from humans besides the data. In the Wolfram Language, this is the role of the functions Classify and Predict. For example, let’s train a classifier to recognize morels from hedgehog mushrooms:

c = Classify[{

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John Fultz

Notebooks in Your Pocket—Wolfram Player for iOS Is Now Shipping

October 4, 2017 — John Fultz, Director of User Interface Technology

Ten months ago, I announced the beginning of our open beta program for Wolfram Player for iOS. The beta is over, and we are now shipping Wolfram Player in the App Store. Wolfram Player for iOS joins Wolfram CDF Player on Windows, Mac and Linux as a free platform for sharing your notebook content with the world.

Wolfram Player

Wolfram Player is the first native computational notebook experience ever on iOS. You can now take your notebooks with you and play them offline. Wolfram Player supports notebooks running interfaces backed by Version 11.1 of the Wolfram Language—an 11.2 release will come shortly. Wolfram Player includes the same kernel that you would find in any desktop or cloud release of the Wolfram Language.

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Shadi Ashnai
Markus van Almsick

Computational Microscopy with the Wolfram Language

September 29, 2017
Shadi Ashnai, Manager, Image Processing
Markus van Almsick, Consultant, Algorithms R&D

Microscopes were invented almost four hundred years ago. But today, there’s a revolution in microscopy (as in so many other fields) associated with computation. We’ve been working hard to make the Wolfram Language a definitive platform for the emerging field of computational microscopy.

It all starts with getting an image of some kind—whether from a light or x-ray microscope, transmission electron microscope (TEM), confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM), two-photon excitation or a scanning electron microscope (SEM), as well as many more. You can then proceed to enhance images, reconstruct objects and perform measurements, detection, recognition and classification. At last month’s Microscopy & Microanalysis conference, we showed various examples of this pipeline, starting with a Zeiss microscope and a ToupTek digital camera.

Microanalysis tools

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Stephen Wolfram

It’s Another Impressive Release! Launching Version 11.2 Today

September 14, 2017 — Stephen Wolfram

Our Latest R&D Output

I’m excited today to announce the latest output from our R&D pipeline: Version 11.2 of the Wolfram Language and Mathematica—available immediately on desktop (Mac, Windows, Linux) and cloud.

It was only this spring that we released Version 11.1. But after the summer we’re now ready for another impressive release—with all kinds of additions and enhancements, including 100+ entirely new functions:

New functions word cloud

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Greg Hurst

A New Level of Step-by-Step Solutions in Wolfram|Alpha

September 7, 2017 — Greg Hurst, Wolfram|Alpha Math Content Manager

See what is new in step-by-step solutions

In our continued efforts to make it easier for students to learn and understand math and science concepts, the Wolfram|Alpha team has been hard at work this summer expanding our step-by-step solutions. Since the school year is just beginning, we’re excited to announce some new features.

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Michael Trott

How Laplace Would Hide a Goat: The New Science of Magic Windows

August 25, 2017 — Michael Trott, Chief Scientist

Last week, I read Michael Berry’s paper, “Laplacian Magic Windows.” Over the years, I have read many interesting papers by this longtime Mathematica user, but this one stood out for its maximizing of the product of simplicity and unexpectedness. Michael discusses what he calls the magic window. For 70+ years, we have known about holograms, and now we know about magic windows. So what exactly is a magic window? Here is a sketch of the optics of one:

Magic window optics sketch

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Posted in: Mathematics

Jeffrey Bryant

Double Eclipse! Or Why Carbondale, Illinois, Is Special

August 14, 2017 — Jeffrey Bryant, Research Programmer, Wolfram|Alpha Scientific Content

Eclipse paths crossing

The upcoming August 21, 2017, total solar eclipse is a fascinating event in its own right. It’s also interesting to note that on April 8, 2024, there will be another total solar eclipse whose path will cut nearly perpendicular to the one this year.

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Jeffrey Bryant

Get Ready for the Total Solar Eclipse of 2017

August 8, 2017 — Jeffrey Bryant, Research Programmer, Wolfram|Alpha Scientific Content

Eclipse illustrations with the Wolfram Language

On August 21, 2017, an event will happen across parts of the Western Hemisphere that has not been seen by most people in their lifetimes. A total eclipse of the Sun will sweep across the face of the United States and nearby oceans. Although eclipses of this type are not uncommon across the world, the chance of one happening near you is quite small and is often a once-in-a-lifetime event unless you happen to travel the world regularly. This year, the total eclipse will be within driving distance of most people in the lower 48 states.

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Stephen Wolfram

High-School Summer Camp: A Two-Week Path to Computational Thinking

August 2, 2017 — Stephen Wolfram

The Summer Camp Was a Success!

How far can one get in teaching computational thinking to high-school students in two weeks? Judging by the results of this year’s Wolfram High-School Summer Camp the answer is: remarkably far.

I’ve been increasingly realizing what an immense and unique opportunity there now is to teach computational thinking with the whole stack of technology we’ve built up around the Wolfram Language. But it was a thrill to see just how well this seems to actually work with real high-school students—and to see the kinds of projects they managed to complete in only two weeks.

Wolfram Summer Camp 2017

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Roger Germundsson
Jan Brugård
Patrik Ekenberg

Announcing SystemModeler 5: Symbolic Parametric Simulation, Modular Reconfigurability and 200 New Built-in Components

July 25, 2017
Roger Germundsson, Director of Research & Development
Jan Brugård, CEO, Wolfram MathCore
Patrik Ekenberg, Applications Engineer, Wolfram MathCore

New in SystemModeler

Our goal with SystemModeler is to provide a state-of-the-art environment for modeling, simulation—and analytics—that leverages the Wolfram technology stack and builds on the Modelica standard for systems description (that we helped to develop).

SystemModeler is routinely used by the world’s engineering organizations on some of the world’s most complex engineering systems—as well as in fields such as life sciences and social science. We’ve been pursuing the development of what is now SystemModeler for more than 15 years, adding more and more sophistication to the capabilities of the system. And today we’re pleased to announce the latest step forward: SystemModeler 5.

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