Lois Jamieson

Join Us for the Computation Meets Data Science Conference in London, 11 May

April 26, 2017 — Lois Jamieson, Marketing Projects Coordinator

Data Science Conference

With the world of data science developing at a rapid pace and companies increasingly aware of its importance, Wolfram is pleased to bring together a range of data science experts at the Computation Meets Data Science Conference on 11 May, in partnership with the Satellite Applications Catapult and Digital Catapult.

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Stephen Wolfram

Launching the Wolfram Data Repository: Data Publishing that Really Works

April 20, 2017 — Stephen Wolfram

After a Decade, It’s Finally Here!

I’m pleased to announce that as of today, the Wolfram Data Repository is officially launched! It’s been a long road. I actually initiated the project a decade ago—but it’s only now, with all sorts of innovations in the Wolfram Language and its symbolic ways of representing data, as well as with the arrival of the Wolfram Cloud, that all the pieces are finally in place to make a true computable data repository that works the way I think it should.

Wolfram Data Respository

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Swede White

Walking the Dog: Neural Nets, Image Identification and Geolocation

April 11, 2017 — Swede White, Media & Communications Specialist

Walking the dog

It’s National Pet Day on April 11, the day we celebrate furry, feathered or otherwise nonhuman companions. To commemorate the date, we thought we’d use some new features in the Wolfram Language to map a dog walk using pictures taken with a smartphone along the way. After that, we’ll use some neural net functions to identify the content in the photos. One of the great things about Wolfram Language 11.1 is pre-trained neural nets, including Inception V3 trained on ImageNet Competition data and Inception V1 trained on Places365 data, among others, making it super easy for a novice programmer to implement them. These two pre-trained neural nets make it easy to: 1) identify objects in images; and 2) tell a user what sort of landscape an image represents.

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Posted in: Wolfram Language

Håkan Wettergren

How to Use Your Smartphone for Vibration Analysis, Part 2: The Wolfram Cloud

April 7, 2017 — Håkan Wettergren, Applications Engineer, SystemModeler (MathCore)

Making tone with wine glass

Vibration measurement is an important tool for fault detection in rotating machinery. In a previous post, “How to Use Your Smartphone for Vibration Analysis, Part 1: The Wolfram Language,” I described how you can perform a vibration analysis with a smartphone and Mathematica. Here, I will show how this technique can be improved upon using the Wolfram Cloud. One advantage with this is that I don’t need to bring my laptop.

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Markus Dahl

Communication in Industry 4.0 with Wolfram SystemModeler and OPC UA

March 28, 2017 — Markus Dahl, Applications Engineer, SystemModeler (MathCore)

SystemModeler OPCUA Industry 4.0

Background

Industry 4.0, the fourth industrial revolution of cyber-physical systems, is on the way! With it come sensors and boards that are much cheaper than they used to be. All of these components are connected through some kind of network or cloud so that they are able to talk to each other. This is where the OPC Unified Architecture (OPC UA) comes in. OPC UA is a machine-to-machine communication protocol for industrial automation. It is designed to be the successor to the older OPC Classic protocol that is bound to the Microsoft-only process exchange COM/DCOM (if you are interested in the OPCClassic library for Wolfram SystemModeler, you can find it here).

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Posted in: SystemModeler

Lizzie Turner

Apply Now for the 15th Annual Wolfram Summer School

March 21, 2017 — Lizzie Turner, Program Manager, Advanced Research Group

Wolfram Summer School participants

This year’s Wolfram Summer School will be held at Bentley University in Waltham, Massachusetts, from June 18 to July 7, 2017.

Maybe you’re a researcher who wants to study the dynamics of galaxies with cellular automata. Perhaps you’re an innovator who wants to create a way to read time from pictures of analog clocks or build a new startup with products that use RFID (radio-frequency identification) to track objects. You might be an educator who wants to build an algebra feedback system or write a textbook that teaches designers how to disinvent the need for air conditioning. These projects show the diversity and creativity of some of our recent Summer School students. Does this sound like you? If so, we want you to join us this summer!

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Posted in: Education

Stephen Wolfram

The R&D Pipeline Continues: Launching Version 11.1

March 16, 2017 — Stephen Wolfram

A Minor Release That’s Not Minor

I’m pleased to announce the release today of Version 11.1 of the Wolfram Language (and Mathematica). As of now, Version 11.1 is what’s running in the Wolfram Cloud—and desktop versions are available for immediate download for Mac, Windows and Linux.

What’s new in Version 11.1? Well, actually a remarkable amount. Here’s a summary:

Summary of new features

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Jeffrey Bryant

Visualizing Anatomy

March 10, 2017 — Jeffrey Bryant, Scientific Information Group

Brain image

In Mathematica 10, we introduced support for anatomical structures in EntityValue, which included, among many other things, a “Graphics3D” property that returns a 3D model of the anatomical structure in question. We also styled the models and aligned them with the concepts in the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS).

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Håkan Wettergren

How to Use Your Smartphone for Vibration Analysis, Part 1: The Wolfram Language

March 2, 2017 — Håkan Wettergren, Applications Engineer, SystemModeler (MathCore)

Until now, it has been difficult for the average engineer to perform simple vibration analysis. The initial cost for simple equipment, including software, may be several thousand dollars—and it is not unusual for advanced equipment and software to cost ten times as much. Normally, a vibration specialist starts an investigation with a hammer impact test. An accelerometer is mounted on a structure, and a special impact hammer is used to excite the structure at several locations in the simplest and most common form of hammer impact testing. The accelerometer and hammer-force signals are recorded. Modal analysis is then used to get a preliminary understanding of the behavior of the system. The minimum equipment requirements for such a test are an accelerometer, an impact hammer, amplifiers, a signal recorder and analysis software.

I’ve figured out how to use the Wolfram Language on my smartphone to sample and analyze machine vibration and noise, and to perform surprisingly good vibration analysis. I’ll show you how, and give you some simple Wolfram Language code to get you started.

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Jeffrey Bryant
Paco Jain
Michael Trott

Hidden Figures: Modern Approaches to Orbit and Reentry Calculations

February 24, 2017
Jeffrey Bryant, Scientific Information Group
Paco Jain, Research Programmer, Wolfram|Alpha Scientific Content
Michael Trott, Chief Scientist

The movie Hidden Figures was released in theaters recently and has been getting good reviews. It also deals with an important time in US history, touching on a number of topics, including civil rights and the Space Race. The movie details the hidden story of Katherine Johnson and her coworkers (Dorothy Vaughan and Mary Jackson) at NASA during the Mercury missions and the United States’ early explorations into manned space flight. The movie focuses heavily on the dramatic civil rights struggle of African American women in NASA at the time, and these struggles are set against the number-crunching ability of Johnson and her coworkers. Computers were in their early days at this time, so Johnson and her team’s ability to perform complicated navigational orbital mechanics problems without the use of a computer provided an important sanity check against the early computer results.

Row[{Show[    Entity["Movie", "HiddenFigures::k39bj"][     EntityProperty["Movie", "Image"]], ImageSize -> 101], "  ",    Show[Entity["PopularCurve", "KatherineJohnsonCurve"][     EntityProperty["PopularCurve", "Image"]], Axes -> False,     Background -> LightBlue, ImageSize -> 120]}]

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Posted in: History, Mathematics