Danielle Rommel

A New Kind of eSport: Livecoding Championship Live from the Wolfram Technology Conference 2018

October 16, 2018 — Danielle Rommel, Director of Outreach and Communications, Public Relations

Hero

Join us Wednesday, October 17, 2018, from 9:30–11:30pm CT for an exciting adventure in livecoding! During our annual Wolfram Technology Conference, we put our internal experts and guests to the test. Coding questions ranging from physics to pop culture, image processing to visualizations, and all other things challenging will be posed to participants live.

Who will take home the trophy belt this year? A senior developer from our Machine Learning group? A high-school kid with serious coding chops? You? Now in its third year, the Wolfram Livecoding Championship promises to be bigger and better than ever. The event is concurrently livestreamed on Twitch and YouTube Live, so if you’re not able to be here in person, we’d love to see you on the stream. The livestream will also be available on Stephen Wolfram’s Twitch channel, with a special livestreamed introduction from Stephen himself. See last year’s competition and get a taste of what the event has to offer:

Top coders

New this year will be running commentary on competitors’ progress as they each take their own unique approach to problem solving, highlighting the depth and breadth of possibilities in the Wolfram Language.

Stay tuned for more competitions, and we hope to see you there!

Posted in: Events

Daniel Lichtblau

Revisiting the Disputed Federalist Papers: Historical Forensics with the Chaos Game Representation and AI

October 11, 2018 — Daniel Lichtblau, Symbolic Algorithms Developer, Algorithms R&D

Hero

Between October 1787 and April 1788, a series of essays was published under the pseudonym of “Publius.” Altogether, 77 appeared in four New York City periodicals, and a collection containing these and eight more appeared in book form as The Federalist soon after. As of the twentieth century, these are known collectively as The Federalist Papers. The aim of these essays, in brief, was to explain the proposed Constitution and influence the citizens of the day in favor of ratification thereof. The authors were Alexander Hamilton, James Madison and John Jay.

On July 11, 1804, Alexander Hamilton was mortally wounded by Aaron Burr, in a duel beneath the New Jersey Palisades in Weehawken (a town better known in modern times for its tunnels to Manhattan and Alameda). Hamilton died the next day. Soon after, a list he had drafted became public, claiming authorship of more than sixty essays. James Madison publicized his claims to authorship only after his term as president had come to an end, many years after Hamilton’s death. Their lists overlapped, in that essays 49–58 and 62–63 were claimed by both men. Three essays were claimed by each to have been collaborative works, and essays 2–5 and 64 were written by Jay (intervening illness being the cause of the gap). Herein we refer to the 12 claimed by both men as “the disputed essays.”

CONTINUE READING »


Chapin Langenheim

Interpreting with Neural Nets, Preventing Collapses and Beyond: Wolfram Community Highlights

September 27, 2018 — Chapin Langenheim, Coordinating Editor, Document and Media Systems

People from around the globe continue to join Wolfram Community, our tech-oriented social network, which now surpasses 19,000 members. Along with an improved platform design, we have also introduced new features—now, discussions contain statistics of likes, views and comments, so when your post becomes popular you can showcase the metrics of your success. Sharing has also become easier with an in-discussion, social media–sharing toolbar. We’ve introduced skills and job opportunities in member profiles, so keep yours up to date—it might be quite beneficial for your networking and career.

Take a look at some of the posts making Wolfram Community so popular. We’d love to see you posting your Wolfram technology–based projects too!

CONTINUE READING »

Posted in: Wolfram Community

Greg Hurst
Matt Gelber

Free-Form Bioprinting with Mathematica and the Wolfram Language

September 20, 2018
Greg Hurst, Consultant, Wolfram|Alpha Math Content
Matt Gelber, Postdoctoral Researcher, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

In past blog posts, we’ve talked about the Wolfram Language’s built-in, high-level functionality for 3D printing. Today we’re excited to share an example of how some more general functionality in the language is being used to push the boundaries of this technology. Specifically, we’ll look at how computation enables 3D printing of very intricate sugar structures, which can be used to artificially create physiological channel networks like blood vessels.

CONTINUE READING »


Devendra Kapadia

Prepare for AP Calculus and More with Wolfram U

September 18, 2018 — Devendra Kapadia, Kernel Developer, Algorithms R&D

Today I am proud to announce a free interactive course, Introduction to Calculus, hosted on Wolfram’s learning hub, Wolfram U! The course is designed to give a comprehensive introduction to fundamental concepts in calculus such as limits, derivatives and integrals. It includes 38 video lessons along with interactive notebooks that offer examples in the Wolfram Cloud—all for free. This is the second of Wolfram U’s fully interactive free online courses, powered by our cloud and notebook technology.

This introduction to the profound ideas that underlie calculus will help students and learners of all ages anywhere in the world to master the subject. While the course requires no prior knowledge of the Wolfram Language, the concepts illustrated by the language are geared toward easy reader comprehension due to its human-readable nature. Studying calculus through this course is a good way for high-school students to prepare for AP Calculus AB.

CONTINUE READING »


Noriko Yasui

Wolfram|Alpha日本語版 – 日本語の数学の質問に日本語で答えてくれる

September 17, 2018 — Noriko Yasui, Senior Developer, Data and Semantics Engineering

Wolfram|Alpha senior developer Noriko Yasui explains the basic features of the Japanese version of Wolfram|Alpha. This version was released in June 2018, and its mathematics domain has been completely localized into Japanese. Yasui shows how Japanese students, teachers and professionals can ask mathematical questions and obtain the results in their native language. In addition to these basic features, she introduces a unique feature of Japanese Wolfram|Alpha: curriculum-based Japanese high-school math examples. Japanese high-school students can see how Wolfram|Alpha answers typical questions they see in their math textbooks or college entrance exams.


CONTINUE READING »


Jon McLoone

Thrust Supersonic Car Engineering Insights: Applying Multiparadigm Data Science

September 11, 2018 — Jon McLoone, Director, Technical Communication & Strategy

Having a really broad toolset and an open mind on how to approach data can lead to interesting insights that are missed when data is looked at only through the lens of statistics or machine learning. It’s something we at Wolfram Research call multiparadigm data science, which I use here for a small excursion through calculus, graph theory, signal processing, optimization and statistics to gain some interesting insights into the engineering of supersonic cars.

Car gauges

CONTINUE READING »


Brian Wood

Cleaning and Structuring Large Datasets: Web Scraping with the Wolfram Language, Part 2

September 6, 2018 — Brian Wood, Lead Technical Marketing Writer, Document and Media Systems

Hero

In my previous post, I demonstrated the first step of a multiparadigm data science workflow: extracting data. Now it’s time to take a closer look at how the Wolfram Language can help make sense of that data by cleaning it, sorting it and structuring it for your workflow. I’ll discuss key Wolfram Language functions for making imported data easier to browse, query and compute with, as well as share some strategies for automating the process of importing and structuring data. Throughout this post, I’ll refer to the US Election Atlas website, which contains tables of US presidential election results for given years:

Table

CONTINUE READING »


Chapin Langenheim

Wolfram ❤s Teachers: A Gift Basket for Educators

August 30, 2018 — Chapin Langenheim, Coordinating Editor, Document and Media Systems

Teachers, professors, parents-as-teachers—to ease the transition into the fall semester, we’ve compiled some of our favorite Wolfram resources for educators! We appreciate everything you do, and we hope you find this cornucopia of computation useful.

CONTINUE READING »

Posted in: Education, Events

Brian Wood

Data Science + Engineering: Building a Centralized Computation Hub

August 23, 2018 — Brian Wood, Lead Technical Marketing Writer, Document and Media Systems

As the technology manager for Assured Flow Solutions, Andrew Yule has long relied on the Wolfram Language as his go-to tool for petroleum production analytics, from quick computations to large-scale modeling and analysis. “I haven’t come across something yet that the Wolfram Language hasn’t been able to help me do,” he says. So when Yule set out to consolidate all of his team’s algorithms and data into one system, the Wolfram Language seemed like the obvious choice.

CONTINUE READING »