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How to Use Your Smartphone for Vibration Analysis, Part 2: The Wolfram Cloud

Vibration measurement is an important tool for fault detection in rotating machinery. In a previous post, "How to Use Your Smartphone for Vibration Analysis, Part 1: The Wolfram Language," I described how you can perform a vibration analysis with a smartphone and Mathematica. Here, I will show how this technique can be improved upon using the Wolfram Cloud. One advantage with this is that I don't need to bring my laptop.
Announcements & Events

Announcing Wolfram Enterprise Private Cloud

Today I'm pleased to announce Wolfram Enterprise Private Cloud (EPC), which takes the unique benefits of the Wolfram technology stack---ultimate computation, integrated language and deployment---and makes them available in a centralized, private, secure enterprise solution. In essence, EPC enables you to put computation at the heart of your infrastructure and in turn deliver a complete enterprise computation solution for your organization.
Computation & Analysis

The Coffee “Flavor-Rator”

I drink too much coffee---it's one of my few vices. Recently, my favorite espresso machine at the Wolfram Research headquarters in Champaign, Illinois, was replaced with a fancy new combination coffee and espresso maker. The coffee now comes in little pouches of various flavors, ranging from "light and smooth" to "dark and intense". There even is a "hot chocolate" pouch and a way to make cappuccinos using both a "froth" pouch and an "espresso" pouch. Here is a picture of the new coffee selection:
Computation & Analysis

Instant Apps for the Apple Watch with the Wolfram Language

Note added 04/30/2018: Due to changes around Apple Watch and WatchKit, the Wolfram Cloud app does not currently support Apple Watch. The functionality described in this post remains available for other mobile devices. My goal with the Wolfram Language is to take programming to a new level. And over the past year we've been rolling out ways to use and deploy the language in many places---desktop, cloud, mobile, embedded, etc. So what about wearables? And in particular, what about the Apple Watch? A few days ago I decided to explore what could be done. So I cleared my schedule for the day, and started writing code. My idea was to write code with our standard Wolfram Programming Cloud, but instead of producing a web app or web API, to produce an app for the Apple Watch. And conveniently enough, a preliminary version of our Wolfram Cloud app just became available in the App Store---letting me deploy from the Wolfram Cloud to both mobile devices and the watch.
Announcements & Events

Scientific Bug Hunting in the Cloud: An Unexpected CEO Adventure

The Wolfram Cloud Needs to Be Perfect

The Wolfram Cloud is coming out of beta soon (yay!), and right now I'm spending much of my time working to make it as good as possible (and, by the way, it's getting to be really great!). Mostly I concentrate on defining high-level function and strategy. But I like to understand things at every level, and as a CEO, one's ultimately responsible for everything. And at the beginning of March I found myself diving deep into something I never expected... Here's the story. As a serious production system that lots of people will use to do things like run businesses, the Wolfram Cloud should be as fast as possible. Our metrics were saying that typical speeds were good, but subjectively when I used it something felt wrong. Sometimes it was plenty fast, but sometimes it seemed way too slow. We've got excellent software engineers, but months were going by, and things didn't seem to be changing. Meanwhile, we'd just released the Wolfram Data Drop. So I thought, why don't I just run some tests myself, maybe collecting data in our nice new Wolfram Data Drop? A great thing about the Wolfram Language is how friendly it is for busy people: even if you only have time to dash off a few lines of code, you can get real things done. And in this case, I only had to run three lines of code to find a problem. First, I deployed a web API for a trivial Wolfram Language program to the Wolfram Cloud:
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MHacks V’s Winning Hack Uses Wolfram Programming Cloud

Draw Anything, an iOS app designed and created by Olivia Walch and Matt Jacobs, was the winning hack at the recent MHacks V. Utilizing the power of Wolfram Programming Cloud, the two Draw Anything hackers came out on top after a fierce competition between more than 250 talented teams, made up of 1,200 hackers representing over 100 universities. Students from around the world came to learn, network, and "spend 36 hours building anything they can imagine."
Academics

The Wolfram Language for the Hour of Code

Get ready, get set… code! It’s the time of year to get thinking about programming with the Hour of Code. For many years, Wolfram Research has promoted and supported initiatives that encourage computation, programming, and STEM education, and we are always thrilled when efforts are taken by others to do the same. Code.org, in conjunction with Computer Science Education Week, is sponsoring an event to encourage educators and organizations across the country to dedicate a single hour to coding. This hour gives kids (and adults, too!) a taste of what it means to study computer science---and how it can actually be a creative, fun, and fulfilling process. Millions of students participated in the Hour of Code in past years, and instructors are looking for more engaging activities for their students to try. Enter the Wolfram Language. Built into the Wolfram Language is the technology from Wolfram|Alpha that enables natural language input---and lets students create code just by writing English.
Announcements & Events

Presentations Available from Wolfram Experts Live: New in Mathematica 10

Following one of our most anticipated releases to date, we hosted the virtual workshop Wolfram Experts Live: New in Mathematica 10 to give the Wolfram community the details on this latest version of our flagship product Mathematica. A dozen Wolfram experts and Mathematica developers came together at our headquarters—both in person and remotely via online connections---to take turns showing off new advances in usability, algorithmic functionality, and integration with the Wolfram Cloud. Presenters participated in a live Q&A with the online audience, and in turn were able to hear from Mathematica users and enthusiasts.