Wolfram Computation Meets Knowledge

Other Application Areas

Announcements & Events

Sharing Your Creations Just Got Easier with the Wolfram Language Paclet Repository

Since we released the Wolfram Function Repository in June 2019, we’ve often run into situations where someone wants to distribute content that can’t easily be contained in a single, standalone function. The answer is usually to create a paclet, the Wolfram Language equivalent to what would be called a package in other programing languages. Paclets have been around for quite some time. They are regularly used by Wolfram developers to deliver and update system-level functionality and have been documented since Version 12.1 of Wolfram Language.
Education & Academic

Getting Hot and Spicy on the Scoville Scale with Wolfram Language

National Chili Day is February 23 and we’re celebrating the spicy heat that peppers bring to a great bowl of chili by exploring the "ScovilleRating" property in Wolfram Language. The Scoville scale ranks the spiciness (or pungency) of peppers by measuring the amount of the molecule capsaicin in a pepper and assigning it a number rating in Scoville heat units (SHUs). Pharmacist and chemist Wilbur Scoville introduced the “Scoville organoleptic test,” which eventually became the Scoville scale, in 1912. At the time, Mr. Scoville relied on human taste testers willing to do this challenging job. Today, scientists use high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to determine the precise amount of capsaicin in a pepper.
Computation & Analysis

Formation Flight with the Wolfram System Modeler Aircraft Library

Explore the contents of this article with a free Wolfram System Modeler trial. The Swedish Air Force has an annual tradition of greeting the people of Sweden at the end of the year by flying their fighter jets in a formation shaped like a Christmas tree. Besides welcoming everyone, this tradition plays a role as a valuable rehearsal for the fighter pilots in formation flying and is a way to show their presence. Thus, the large amounts of fuel burned by the fighter jets, which are most certainly not known for their fuel efficiency, may be excused in this tradition.

Current Events & History

What Is ChatGPT Doing … and Why Does It Work?

That ChatGPT can automatically generate something that reads even superficially like human-written text is remarkable, and unexpected. But how does it do it? And why does it work? My purpose here is to give a rough outline of what’s going on inside ChatGPT—and then to explore why it is that it can do so well […]

Announcements & Events

Wolfram Technology Conference 2022

For more than three decades, Wolfram Research has brought together the most interesting cohort of Wolfram technology users from around the globe to network and learn during its annual Wolfram Technology Conference. This year, I was able to participate in my first conference. I am neither an expert nor even a practitioner of computational science, but rather an enthusiast of the technology industry and a relatively new employee of Wolfram.

My goal in attending was to sit back and soak up as much as I could in panels and discussions with the other attendees and speakers. I was in awe to see the Wolfram technology stack being used in so many unique applications. It was immediately made clear that, despite actively seeking out and promoting unique projects on our blog, I truly had no idea how many different areas are innovating with Wolfram technologies.

Announcements & Events

Winners of the 2022 One-Liner and Get Visual Competitions

For 11 years, it has been tradition for the Wolfram Technology Conference to push our users to go above and beyond in Wolfram Language with our annual One-Liner Competition. In the competition, users are given a limit of 140 characters to create the most incredible output, which is then judged blindly based on brevity, aesthetics and original use of Wolfram Language.
Announcements & Events

Wolfram CloudConnector: Excel’s Data Science Superpower

Love it or hate it, Excel is used the world over for everything from quickly adding a couple of numbers together to accidentally losing tens of thousands of COVID-19 cases in the UK. But if you’ve ever had to use Excel for anything beyond INDEX MATCH (or *shudder* VLOOKUP), you’ve probably found yourself nonstop Googling only to find out Excel isn’t really built for what you're doing.