Chapin Langenheim

Peppa Pig, Tracking Meteorite Trajectory and Computational Linguistics: Wolfram Community Highlights

March 21, 2019 — Chapin Langenheim, Editorial Project Coordinator, Web and Product Release Management

Starry night over water

Over the past 16 weeks, Wolfram Community has gained over 1,000 new members—surpassing 21,000 members total! We’ve also seen more activity, with 800,000 pageviews and 160,000 new readers in that time period. We enjoy seeing the interesting and unique projects Wolfram Language users come up with and are excited to share some of the posts that make Wolfram Community a favorite platform for sharing, socializing and networking.

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Shenghui Yang

3D Printing “Spikey” Commemorative Coins with the Wolfram Language

March 14, 2019 — Shenghui Yang, Developer, Wolfram|Alpha Localization Systems

Spikey commemorative coins with the Wolfram Language

I approached my friend Frederick Wu and suggested that we should make a physical Wolfram Spikey Coin (not to be confused with a Wolfram Blockchain Token!) for the celebration of the 30th anniversary of Mathematica. Frederick is a long-term Mathematica user and coin collector, and together, we challenged ourselves to design our own commemorative coin for such a special event.

The iconic Spikey is a life-long companion of Mathematica, coined (no pun intended) in 1988 with the release of Version 1. Now, we’ve reached a time in which Wolfram technologies and different 3D printing processes happily marry together to make this project possible!

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Ed Pegg Jr

Shattering the Plane with Twelve New Substitution Tilings Using 2, φ, ψ, χ, ρ

March 7, 2019 — Ed Pegg Jr, Editor, Wolfram Demonstrations Project

This post discusses new Wolfram Language features from the upcoming release of Version 12. Copyable input expressions and a downloadable notebook version of this post will be available when Version 12 is released.

The sqrt(χ) substitution tiling fractal

Similar Triangle Dissections

Version 12 of the Wolfram Language introduces solvers for geometry problems. The documentation for the new function GeometricScene has a neat example showing the following piece of code, with GeometricAssertion calling for seven similar triangles:

Sqrt(ρ) substitution tiling
&#10005

o=Sequence[Opacity[.9],EdgeForm[Black]];plasticDissection=RandomInstance[GeometricScene[{a,b,c,d,e,f,g},{
a=={1,0},e=={0,0},Line[{a,e,d,c}],
p0==Polygon[{a,b,c}],
p1==Style[Polygon[{b,d,c}],Orange,o],
p2==Style[Polygon[{d,f,e}],Yellow,o],
p3==Style[Polygon[{b,f,d}],Blue,o],
p4==Style[Polygon[{g,f,b}],Green,o],
p5==Style[Polygon[{e,g,f}],Magenta,o],
p6==Style[Polygon[{a,e,g}],Purple,o],
GeometricAssertion[{p0,p1,p2,p3,p4,p5,p6},"Similar"]}],RandomSeeding->28]

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Christopher Carlson

Computing in 128 Characters: Winners of the 2018 Wolfram Employees One-Liner Competition

February 26, 2019 — Christopher Carlson, Senior User Interface Developer, User Interfaces

This post discusses new Wolfram Language features from the upcoming release of Version 12. Copyable input expressions and a downloadable notebook will be available when Version 12 is released.

Every year at the Wolfram Technology Conference, attendees take part in the One-Liner Competition, a contest to see who can do the most astounding things with 128 characters of Wolfram Language code. Wolfram employees are not allowed to compete out of fairness to our conference visitors, but nevertheless every year I get submissions and requests to submit from my colleagues that I have to reject. To provide an outlet for their eagerness to show how cool the software is that they develop, this year we organized the first internal One-Liner Competition.

Abstract Art

We awarded first-, second- and third-place prizes as well as six honorable mentions and one dishonorable mention. And the winners are…

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Toni Schindler

Let’s Tango: Computational Musicology Using Wikidata, MusicBrainz and the Wolfram Language

February 14, 2019 — Toni Schindler, Consultant, Wolfram|Alpha Scientific Content

This post discusses new Wolfram Language features from the upcoming release of Version 12. Copyable input expressions and a downloadable notebook version of this post will be available when Version 12 is released.

Imagine you could import any website to obtain meaningful data for further processing, like creating a diagram, highlighting places on a map or integrating with other data sources. What if you could query data on the web knowing only one simple query language? That’s the vision of the semantic web. The semantic web is based on standards like the Resource Description Framework (RDF) and SPARQL (a query language for RDF). The upcoming release of Version 12 of the Wolfram Language introduces experimental support for interacting with the semantic web: you will be able to Import and Export a variety of RDF data formats as well as query remote SPARQL endpoints and in-memory data using either a query string or a symbolic representation of SPARQL.

Computational Musicology Using Wikidata and MusicBrainz

Image Map

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Andrew Steinacher

The Data Science of MathOverflow

February 1, 2019 — Andrew Steinacher, Lead Developer, Wolfram|Alpha Scientific Content

This post discusses new Wolfram Language features from the upcoming release of Version 12. Copyable input expressions and a downloadable notebook version of this post will be available when Version 12 is released.

New Archive Conversion Utility in Version 12

Soon there will be 100,000 questions on MathOverflow.net, a question-and-answer site for professional mathematicians! To celebrate this event, I have been working on a Wolfram Language utility package to convert archives of Stack Exchange network websites into Wolfram Language entity stores.

The archives are hosted on the Internet Archive and are updated every few months. The package, although not yet publicly available, will be released in the coming weeks as part of Version 12 of the Wolfram Language—so keep watching this space for more news about the release!

MathOverflow

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Jacob Wells

How I Became a Wine Expert Using the Wolfram Language

January 24, 2019 — Jacob Wells, Technical Specialist, European Sales

Do you select a bottle of wine based more on how fancy the sleeve is than its price point? If so, then you’re like me, and you may be looking to minimize the risk of wishful guesses. This article may provide a little rational weight to your purchasing decisions.

Due to my research using the Wolfram Language, I can now mention the fact that if you are spending less than $40 on a random bottle of wine, you have a less than 0.1% chance of finding a 95+-rated wine. I could also perhaps reel off some flavors and characteristics of wines from Tuscany, for example—cherry, fruit, spice and tannins. My aim is to show you how I took a passing idea of mine and brought it to fruition using the Wolfram Language.

How I became a wine expert using the Wolfram Language

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Kathy Bautista

Teacher Resources for Introducing Computational Thinking and Data Science

January 17, 2019 — Kathy Bautista, Senior Sales Initiatives Manager, Academic Sales

As many teachers make the transition back into classes after the holidays, quite a few have plans to update lessons to include segments that introduce data science concepts. Why, you ask?

According to a LinkedIn report published last week, the most promising job in the US in 2019 is data scientist. And if you search for the top “hard skills” needed for 2019, data science is often in the top 10.

Data science, applied computation, predictive analytics… no matter what you call it, in a nutshell it’s gathering insight from data through analysis and knowing what questions to ask to get the right answers. As technology continues to advance, the career landscape also continues to evolve with a greater emphasis on data—so data science has quickly become an essential skill that’s popping up in all sorts of careers, including engineering, business, astronomy, athletics, marketing, economics, farming, meteorology, urban planning, sociology and nursing.

Teacher Resources for Introducing Computational Thinking and Data Science

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Brian Wood

Deploying and Sharing: Web Scraping with the Wolfram Language, Part 3

January 10, 2019 — Brian Wood, Lead Technical Marketing Writer, Document and Media Systems

So far in this series, I’ve covered the process of extracting, cleaning and structuring data from a website. So what does one do with a structured dataset? Continuing with the Election Atlas data from the previous post, this final entry will talk about how to store your scraped data permanently and deploy results to the web for universal access and sharing.

Deploying and Sharing with the Wolfram Language

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Wolfram Blog Team

Trivial Pursuits: Applications and Diversions with the Wolfram Language

January 3, 2019 — Wolfram Blog Team

Mark Greenberg is a retired educator and contributor to the Tech-Based Teaching blog, which explores the intersections between computational thinking, edtech and learning. He recounts his experience adapting old game code using the Wolfram Language and deployment through the Wolfram Cloud.

Chicken Scratch is an academic trivia game that I originally coded about 20 years ago. At the time I was the Academic Decathlon coach of a large urban high school, and I needed a fun way for my students to remember thousands of factoids for the Academic Decathlon competitions. The game turned out to be beneficial to our team, and so popular that other teams asked to buy it from us. I refreshed the questions each year and continued holding Chicken Scratch tournaments at the next two schools I worked in.

Chicken Scratch

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