Wolfram Computation Meets Knowledge

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Academics

Wolfram Neural Networks Boot Camp Recap: Dog vs. Butterfly Optical Illusion Showdown

Neural networks are increasingly a part of society and are used in many aspects of life, especially e-commerce and social media. I recently had the opportunity to attend the Wolfram Neural Networks Boot Camp with developers and researchers who design and utilize Wolfram Language neural net resources. During the boot camp, participants received a crash course on using neural nets in the Wolfram Language.
Academics

Graduate to the Wolfram Early Professionals Program

Each year, 73 billion students use Mathematica and the Wolfram Language at their universities. Okay, that might be an exaggeration, but as the person leading the Wolfram sales team, I see my group fielding questions from tons of students on their options for using Mathematica after they graduate. So perhaps it sometimes just feels like 73 billion.

And that’s a good thing—we’re always excited to help these brilliant young minds use Mathematica and the Wolfram Language to do basic repetitive tasks, from solving integrals or graphing trig functions in their undergraduate work to visualizing complex sets of data or building an AI system for their graduate-level research.

Announcements & Events

Introducing Wolfram Application Server

Wolfram Application Server is a new platform developed by Wolfram Research enabling customers to deploy Wolfram Language–powered APIs and webpages into a scalable, highly available enterprise cluster.

Wolfram Application Server lets you:

manage data exchange in your deployments with a robust external services framework. create applications using the Wolfram Natural Language Understanding (NLU) System, the key semantic interpretation technology behind Wolfram|Alpha and Wolfram Language. generate content based on time and location, assign custom endpoints and integrate curated content from the Wolfram Knowledgebase.

We have designed Wolfram Application Server for customers who for regulatory, security or business reasons may not wish to deploy onto the Wolfram Cloud but prefer to host their Wolfram Language applications on clusters they control.

Announcements & Events

Static Analysis Tools in the Wolfram Language

Catching Common Problems

Finding bugs and fixing them is more than a passion of mine—it’s a compulsion. Several years ago, as a QA developer, I created the MUnit unit testing framework for the Wolfram Language, which is a framework for authoring and running unit tests in the language. Since then, I’ve created more tools to help developers write better Wolfram Language code while seamlessly checking for bugs in the process.

Writing good tests requires a lot of knowledge and a great deal of time. Since we need to be able to test and resolve bugs as quickly as possible in order to release new features on schedule, we turn to static analysis to be able to do so.

Current Events & History

Is Your Function Continuous? Squaring Away the New Function Properties in the Wolfram Language

The Wolfram Language has several hundred built-in functions, ranging from sine to Heun. As a user, you can extend this collection in infinitely many ways by applying arithmetic operations and function composition. This could lead you to defining expressions of bewildering complexity, such as the following:

&#10005 f = SinhIntegral[ LogisticSigmoid[ ScorerHi[Tanh[AiryAi[HermiteH[-(1/2), x] - x + 1]]]]];
You may then ask, “Is continuous?” or “Can be written as a composition of an increasing function with another function?” The powerful new tools for studying function properties in Version 12.2 provide quick answers to such questions—opening the doors for applying a network of theorems and ideas that have been developed by mathematicians during the last few centuries.
Current Events & History

Florida Spring Break 2021: February COVID-19 Data Forecasts the March of the Variants

It is widely believed that students and others spending their 2020 spring break in Florida helped spread COVID-19 far and wide, in the US and elsewhere (see also this study). The picture in 2021 is quite different in several ways. For one, the disease has been in the US for over a year, and an approximated 30% of the population has antibodies from prior exposure. Also, several vaccines are now in use, and close to 20% have received at least one inoculation at the time of this writing. (Since those two groups overlap, the total is believed to be in the ballpark of 45% of the total population.) We now know that children under the age of 16 do not get the disease in large numbers and are not a major vector for its spread. Social distancing practices are in use to varying degrees, and infection numbers are currently falling across the country. This is believed to be due to a combination of increased immunity and non-pharmacological interventions (NPIs) such as social distancing and mask use.
Announcements & Events

Wolfram Technologies in Print: Featuring New Authors, Books and Subject Areas

Wolfram Language users make up an incredibly diverse community. People from all around the globe use Wolfram technologies in a variety of fields and industries. High-school and college students begin to use the Wolfram Language in all types of classes as well as for their own projects, and educators at all institutional levels use Wolfram products to prepare for and teach courses—at the world’s top 200 universities and beyond.

We’ve rounded up some of our users’ recently published books, and were honored to speak with two authors about their projects.
Computation & Analysis

Enhanced Association Tools Now Available in the Wolfram Function Repository

Association has become one of the most commonly used symbols for developers working with any kind of data since it was introduced in Version 10 of the Wolfram Language in 2014. While there are many built-in tools for working with an Association, developers also made many tools themselves as they modernized their code. Now many of those tools have found their way into the Wolfram Function Repository. Here I’ll highlight some of my favorites and show how they compare to built-in Wolfram Language functions.

Announcements & Events

Third-Generation Blockchain Functionality with Tezos and the Wolfram Language

As CEO of Wolfram Blockchain Labs (WBL), I think one of the most exciting parts of my job is collaborating with other leaders in the blockchain space to expand tools for developers and business use cases. For several years now, we’ve been adding a steady stream of blockchain functionality into the Wolfram Language to enable development of knowledge-based distributed applications and computational contracts. You may have noticed the growing number of popular blockchains (ARK, Bitcoin, bloxberg, Cardano, Ethereum, MultiChain...) partnering with us and integrating into our platform. It’s already led to some cool explorations, and we have a lot more in the pipeline.

Today, WBL is happy to announce its latest such collaboration, a partnership with TQ Tezos. That includes Tezos blockchain integration in the Wolfram Language, which is great news for smart contract developers and enthusiasts. But that’s just the beginning. Our long-term plans include a lot of big ideas that we think everyone will be excited about!