September 2, 2015 — Giulio Alessandrini, Mathematica Algorithm R&D

I’ve taken pictures numerous times, either with a camera or with my phone, only to find out that the colors were completely off—they had bluish, reddish, or even greenish tints. Before I started working on image and color processing, this was quite mysterious to me. Moreover, I’d always noticed on my cameras a white balance setting that, when played with, produced results very much like my skewed-color photographs. Could it be these two were related?

That camera setting is indeed the key to correcting a color cast, and it has been added to the Wolfram Language with the ColorBalance function.

Here is a simple example of how it works:

Applying ColorBalance to photos

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August 12, 2015 — Gopal Sarma, Advanced Research Group

The Wolfram Language has had extensive support for string manipulation since Mathematica 5, and in Version 10 it provided uniform symbolic access to a huge repository of computable data via the Wolfram Knowledgebase. Taking advantage of both of these fundamental capabilities, along with new machine learning functionality with Classify and Predict, we’re excited to be making further inroads into the rich domains of natural language processing and text analytics with TextCases, new in Version 10.2.

TextCases, like its sister functions Cases and StringCases, finds instances of patterns in a given input. Whereas Cases operates on Wolfram Language expressions and StringCases on strings, TextCases assumes that the input is human understandable text, from which one can extract known syntactic and semantic entities. These include basic textual types such as words, sentences, and paragraphs, but also more sophisticated semantic types such as countries, cities, and numbers.

As a simple example, let’s use TextCases to find instances of countries in a sentence:

Finding countries in a sentence using TextCases

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July 16, 2015 — Bob Sandheinrich, Software Engineer, Connectivity Group

Despite the ever-growing list of tools I have for communication, email remains one of the most important. I depend on email to find out about all sorts of things: my ultimate Frisbee game is rained out, flights to Denver are only $80, my Dropbox account is almost full, my neighbor’s cat is missing (again). While filters are able to hide the pure junk and sort everything else into reasonable categories, reading and responding to email still requires a lot of manual interaction. The new mail receivers in the Wolfram Language finally let me automatically interact with email.

MailReceiverFunction is a Wolfram Language function that I deploy to the cloud to operate on incoming emails. When I deploy a function, I get an email address. Emails sent to that address will be processed by the function.

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July 9, 2015 — Nick Lariviere, Kernel Developer, Core Mathematica Engineering

A classic problem in numerical date notation is that various countries list year, month, and day in different orders, which was one of the motivations for the introduction of the ISO-8601 date element and interchange formats (Randall Monroe has a nice summary in this xkcd comic). In the upcoming release of the Wolfram Language, we’ve added built-in support for these ISO date formats:

DateString ISODate; DateString ISODateTime

The ISO specification also provides some alternative date representations, such as week dates (year, week of year, and day of week) and ordinal dates (year and day of year):

DateString ISOWeekDate; DateString ISOOrdinalDate

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