December 8, 2015 — Stephen Wolfram

An Elementary Introduction to the Wolfram Language is available in print, free on the web, etc.

An Elementary Introduction to the Wolfram Language

I wasn’t sure if I was ever going to write another book. My last book—A New Kind of Science—took me more than a decade of intensely focused work, and is the largest personal project I’ve ever done.

But a little while ago, I realized there was another book I had to write: a book that would introduce people with no knowledge of programming to the Wolfram Language and the kind of computational thinking it allows.

The result is An Elementary Introduction to the Wolfram Language, published today in print, free on the web, etc.

Read More »

December 3, 2015 — Dana Flinn, Project Administrator, Public Relations

The global Hour of Code event is almost here, and we’re excited to announce that Wolfram will be celebrating this year with a free workshop at our headquarters in Champaign, Illinois. Even if you’ve never programmed before, you can experience the excitement of creating your first website by the time you leave.

The Hour of Code is a global movement reaching tens of millions of students in over 180 countries. It gives a short introduction to computer science and shows how anyone can get involved.

Join us as we celebrate the Hour of Code! Programming experts will be onsite to help demystify code and demonstrate that anyone can learn the basics. This is a wonderful opportunity to try your hand at a new skill, and have a great time in the process.

Hour of Code event

Read More »

November 30, 2015 — Wolfram Blog Team

Cyber Week savings from Wolfram. Get 25% off select software when you buy now until December 6, 2015.

It’s that time of year again and the holidays are upon us. Whatever your gifting traditions, Wolfram has perfect solutions for the tech lovers on your shopping list. From now until December 6, we are offering Cyber Week savings around the world, including North and South America, Australia, and parts of Asia and Africa.

Read More »

November 6, 2015 — Wolfram Blog Team

The San Mateo Event Center hosted the “world’s largest education hackathon” the weekend of October 23 through 25. HackingEDU was high-energy, fast paced, and fun. Over 2,000 people participated; they had 36 hours to create.

On their website, HackingEDU features a quote from Nelson Mandela: “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.” The HackingEDU participants worked hard to make that motto a reality. As with all good hackathons, there was collaboration, learning, and most importantly, cool new coding and inventions.

Wolfram Research was there as a sponsor to assist the competing teams with Wolfram Development Platform, instant APIs, and other aspects of the Wolfram Cloud. We were thrilled to see 21 teams using Wolfram technologies for their projects.

SmartCards, CereBro, Exchangeagram projects from HackingEDU

Read More »

October 28, 2015 — Jenna Giuffrida, Content Administrator, Technical Communications and Strategy Group

We’re well into fall, and even if you’re not a student anymore, who can help but think of books as the weather starts to turn and the leaves begin to change? Here at Wolfram, it’s been an exciting season for new books and authors exploring geometry, differential equations, graphics, and more with Wolfram technologies.

Hands-on Start to Wolfram Mathematica and Programming with the Wolfram Language, Geometry and Mathematica System, and Differential Equations and Boundary Value Problems: Computing and Modeling, 5th edition

Read More »

October 9, 2015 — Rob Morris, Education Product Analyst, Business Analysis

I hope you’ve enjoyed the Wolfram Language in the Classroom series. Today is the fifth and final post in the series and I’ll be talking about introducing more data into civics and social studies classrooms. One of the great things about this lesson is that the data can be drawn from your location, giving it a personalized feel.

This lesson employs a computational thinking methodology by asking students to create and support claims by analyzing data.

Read More »

October 8, 2015 — Adriana Rose, Business Development, Partnerships

It’s on to history for the Wolfram Language in the Classroom series. History and social studies have the potential to incorporate lots of real-world data to examine relationships between politics, economics, and geography. The Wolfram Language comes with built-in knowledge on a wide variety of topics, including historical events, financial information, socioeconomic data, and geographic data.

We’ve mentioned previously in this series the computational approach to thinking that introducing the Wolfram Language into a classroom environment supports; in a social studies class, this approach allows students to find connections by analyzing real-world data. In the following lesson, I’ll show you how to help students explore connections between major war battles and historical financial data using the Wolfram Language. By way of example, here I’ll use the Vietnam War.

Read More »

October 7, 2015 — Rob Morris, Education Product Analyst, Business Analysis

Welcome to day three of the Wolfram Language in the Classroom series. I hope you’ve enjoyed the lessons so far. Today I want to show you how data built into the Wolfram Language can be used in the chemistry classroom. The Wolfram Language has information on over 44,000 chemicals and thus provides a perfect environment for chemistry students to do comparative, data-driven analysis.

The unique advantage of using the Wolfram Language for computational thinking in a chemistry class is that it allows students to analyze curated data to create hypotheses and show correlations in a new way.

Read More »

October 6, 2015 — Adriana Rose, Business Development, Partnerships

It’s day two of the Wolfram Language in the Classroom series, and I’ll be bringing coding into an English class today. For the most part, educators and administrators consider programming a tool only for STEM courses. While coding in the Wolfram Language is excellent for STEM, it is an invaluable tool for many other subject areas as well.

Using the Wolfram Language in an English class supports a computational approach to critical thinking, which allows students to collect and analyze data to become reflective writers. In the following lesson, educators can prompt students to write just a little bit of code to reflect on their written work.

Read More »

October 5, 2015 — Rob Morris, Education Product Analyst, Business Analysis

This post is now available for download as a CDF file in the following languages: Chinese, German, Japanese, and Spanish. Download the Wolfram CDF Player for free here.

Welcome to the first in a series of posts on using the Wolfram Language in the classroom! Each day this week my colleagues and I will share some of our thoughts about how to use the Wolfram Language in various classroom settings. Each post will focus on a different subject and will provide an example lesson for instructors to use with their students, complete with the appropriate grade levels, goals, and procedures. Our lessons are designed with the principles of computational thinking in mind, and we will highlight specifically how these lessons fit into that paradigm.

Today I’ll discuss a subject the Wolfram Language was born and bred to tackle: math. But since there is so much to do with math in the Wolfram Language, we need to focus on a specific aspect. I want to talk about how to use the Wolfram Language to create exploratory tools that allow students to develop their intuition and curiosity without the pressures of rigorous formalization.

Read More »