Giulio Alessandrini

New in the Wolfram Language: ColorBalance

September 2, 2015 — Giulio Alessandrini, Mathematica Algorithm R&D

I’ve taken pictures numerous times, either with a camera or with my phone, only to find out that the colors were completely off—they had bluish, reddish, or even greenish tints. Before I started working on image and color processing, this was quite mysterious to me. Moreover, I’d always noticed on my cameras a white balance setting that, when played with, produced results very much like my skewed-color photographs. Could it be these two were related?

That camera setting is indeed the key to correcting a color cast, and it has been added to the Wolfram Language with the ColorBalance function.

Here is a simple example of how it works:

Applying ColorBalance to photos

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Emily Suess

Wolfram Technology Conference 2015: Pushing the Boundaries of Computation

August 28, 2015 — Emily Suess, Technical Writer, Technical Communications and Strategy Group

Wolfram Technology Conference 2015

The Wolfram Technology Conference 2015 is just a few weeks away, and we’re excited to demonstrate the latest in cloud computing, interactive deployment, mobile devices, and more as we explore how Wolfram technologies are pushing the boundaries of computation.

If you haven’t already reserved your spot for this year’s conference, there’s still time to register.

As the conference draws closer, we’re putting finishing touches on the event schedule, which will include in-depth presentations, hands-on workshops, “Meet-Ups” for attendees with similar interests, recognition of 2015 Wolfram Innovator Award winners, and lots of networking opportunities. Here are some of the topics we’ll be highlighting October 20–22:

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Posted in: Wolfram News

Patrik Ekenberg

Releasing the OPCClassic Library

August 26, 2015 — Patrik Ekenberg, Applications Engineer, Wolfram MathCore

Wouldn’t it be great if you could easily connect your simulation models to your existing infrastructure? Whether you are working in industries such as oil and gas, industrial energy, or life sciences, connecting to your¬†processes in order to monitor and control them is vital.

The OPC (Object Linking and Embedding for Process Control) standard has been developed by industry and the OPC Foundation just for that purpose. OPC is a set of data transfer standards for multi-vendor, multi-platform, secure, and reliable interoperability in industrial automation:

OPC illustarted as a set of data transfer standards

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Posted in: SystemModeler

Richard Asher

Help Fix Maths Education at the Computer-Based Maths Education Summit

August 24, 2015 — Richard Asher, Public Relations

Computer-Based Maths Education Summit with London skyline

When was the last time you had to solve a quadratic equation by hand? If, like me, you haven’t needed that particular skill since high school, then you’ve probably wondered what all that fuss was about! And it’s a good question: why did we spend so much time on those puzzling, formulaic second-degree beasts, using up pencils and erasers like they were going out of fashion, just to find the value of x?

The truth is, in the real, working world of 2015, the value of that pesky x will invariably be found by a computer. The sooner education acknowledges this fact, the better. So says Conrad Wolfram, whose Computer-Based Maths (CBM) initiative is using Wolfram technologies to bring computers and coding into mainstream maths curricula around the world.

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Posted in: Education

Todd Rowland

Summer Schools: Wolfram Science and Wolfram Innovation

August 19, 2015 — Todd Rowland, Academic Director, Wolfram Science and Innovation Initiatives

For three weeks this past July, Wolfram held the annual Wolfram Summer School for over 60 students from around the world. They came to work on projects ranging from aperiodic hexagonal tessellations to computer language grammars to political sentiment microsites. The overarching theme was entrepreneurial science. Participants employed cutting-edge computational tools like Wolfram Programming Cloud, machine learning, and a whole variety of new functions from Version 10.2 of the Wolfram Language.

Quadropter

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Posted in: Education

Jonathan Wallace

The Winner of the GOP Presidential Debate

August 13, 2015 — Jonathan Wallace, Manager, Marketing Communications

A few days ago, Fox News hosted the first presidential primary debate of 2016. The candidates met onstage, vying for support from the GOP electorate. Among the cacophony and crafty messaging, a truly artful winner has emerged: word clouds.

The WordCloud function (1 of 5000+ functions) in the Wolfram Language allows anyone to visualize words, sized by their frequency in a text. With a mere line of code, you can create a compelling word cloud graphic from data, text, or URLs.

But don’t take my word for it; let’s make the WordCloud function earn your support.

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Gopal Sarma

New in the Wolfram Language: TextCases

August 12, 2015 — Gopal Sarma, Advanced Research Group

The Wolfram Language has had extensive support for string manipulation since Mathematica 5, and in Version 10 it provided uniform symbolic access to a huge repository of computable data via the Wolfram Knowledgebase. Taking advantage of both of these fundamental capabilities, along with new machine learning functionality with Classify and Predict, we’re excited to be making further inroads into the rich domains of natural language processing and text analytics with TextCases, new in Version 10.2.

TextCases, like its sister functions Cases and StringCases, finds instances of patterns in a given input. Whereas Cases operates on Wolfram Language expressions and StringCases on strings, TextCases assumes that the input is human understandable text, from which one can extract known syntactic and semantic entities. These include basic textual types such as words, sentences, and paragraphs, but also more sophisticated semantic types such as countries, cities, and numbers.

As a simple example, let’s use TextCases to find instances of countries in a sentence:

Finding countries in a sentence using TextCases

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Posted in: Developer Insights

Adriana O'Brien

2015 Wolfram Summer Camps Exceed Expectations

August 5, 2015 — Adriana O'Brien, Business Development, Partnerships

We say it every year, because it is true, but once again this year’s Wolfram Summer Camps were the most successful yet. Thirty-eight students from seven different countries attended our camps at Bentley University this July. Students came to camp with some prior programming experience, but most had little or no familiarity with the Wolfram Language. In nine short days, however, they were able to produce amazing results.

Collage of Summer Camp students

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Posted in: Education

Jenna Giuffrida

Over the Moon for Guinness World Records’ Diamond Anniversary

July 29, 2015 — Jenna Giuffrida, Content Administrator, Technical Communications and Strategy Group

For the record, let’s start here.

First publication of Guiness World Records

Next month, Guinness World Records will officially celebrate its 60th anniversary as the leading authority on “record-breaking achievement.” A long-cherished favorite for holiday gifting and the coffee table, Guinness World Records not only provides a unique collection of knowledge but also encourages people to challenge the application of those facts. That’s not limited to the public, either; GWR itself holds the record for best-selling annual publication, a record set in 2013 that has yet to be overthrown.

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Posted in: Wolfram|Alpha

Emily Suess

Wolfram Community Featured Posts: Reddit’s 60-Second Button, Raspberry Pi, and More

July 21, 2015 — Emily Suess, Technical Writer, Technical Communications and Strategy Group

Wolfram Community connects you with users from around the world who are doing fun, innovative, and useful things with the Wolfram Language. From game theory and connected devices to astronomy and design, here are a few posts you won’t want to miss.

Reddit 60-second button

Are you familiar with the Reddit 60-second button? The Reddit experiment was a countdown that would vanish if it ever reached zero. Clicking a button gave the countdown another 60 seconds. One Community post brings Wolfram Language visualization and analysis to Reddit’s experiment, which has sparked questions spanning game theory, community psychology, and statistics. David Gathercole started by importing a dataset from April 3 to May 20 into Mathematica and charted some interesting findings. See what he discovered and contribute your own ideas.

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