Stephen Wolfram

It’s Another Impressive Release! Launching Version 11.2 Today

September 14, 2017 — Stephen Wolfram

Our Latest R&D Output

I’m excited today to announce the latest output from our R&D pipeline: Version 11.2 of the Wolfram Language and Mathematica—available immediately on desktop (Mac, Windows, Linux) and cloud.

It was only this spring that we released Version 11.1. But after the summer we’re now ready for another impressive release—with all kinds of additions and enhancements, including 100+ entirely new functions:

New functions word cloud

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Greg Hurst

A New Level of Step-by-Step Solutions in Wolfram|Alpha

September 7, 2017 — Greg Hurst, Wolfram|Alpha Math Content Manager

See what is new in step-by-step solutions

In our continued efforts to make it easier for students to learn and understand math and science concepts, the Wolfram|Alpha team has been hard at work this summer expanding our step-by-step solutions. Since the school year is just beginning, we’re excited to announce some new features.

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Michael Trott

How Laplace Would Hide a Goat: The New Science of Magic Windows

August 25, 2017 — Michael Trott, Chief Scientist

Last week, I read Michael Berry’s paper, “Laplacian Magic Windows.” Over the years, I have read many interesting papers by this longtime Mathematica user, but this one stood out for its maximizing of the product of simplicity and unexpectedness. Michael discusses what he calls the magic window. For 70+ years, we have known about holograms, and now we know about magic windows. So what exactly is a magic window? Here is a sketch of the optics of one:

Magic window optics sketch

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Posted in: Mathematics

Jeffrey Bryant

Double Eclipse! Or Why Carbondale, Illinois, Is Special

August 14, 2017 — Jeffrey Bryant, Research Programmer, Wolfram|Alpha Scientific Content

Eclipse paths crossing

The upcoming August 21, 2017, total solar eclipse is a fascinating event in its own right. It’s also interesting to note that on April 8, 2024, there will be another total solar eclipse whose path will cut nearly perpendicular to the one this year.

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Jeffrey Bryant

Get Ready for the Total Solar Eclipse of 2017

August 8, 2017 — Jeffrey Bryant, Research Programmer, Wolfram|Alpha Scientific Content

Eclipse illustrations with the Wolfram Language

On August 21, 2017, an event will happen across parts of the Western Hemisphere that has not been seen by most people in their lifetimes. A total eclipse of the Sun will sweep across the face of the United States and nearby oceans. Although eclipses of this type are not uncommon across the world, the chance of one happening near you is quite small and is often a once-in-a-lifetime event unless you happen to travel the world regularly. This year, the total eclipse will be within driving distance of most people in the lower 48 states.

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Stephen Wolfram

High-School Summer Camp: A Two-Week Path to Computational Thinking

August 2, 2017 — Stephen Wolfram

The Summer Camp Was a Success!

How far can one get in teaching computational thinking to high-school students in two weeks? Judging by the results of this year’s Wolfram High-School Summer Camp the answer is: remarkably far.

I’ve been increasingly realizing what an immense and unique opportunity there now is to teach computational thinking with the whole stack of technology we’ve built up around the Wolfram Language. But it was a thrill to see just how well this seems to actually work with real high-school students—and to see the kinds of projects they managed to complete in only two weeks.

Wolfram Summer Camp 2017

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Roger Germundsson
Jan Brugård
Patrik Ekenberg

Announcing SystemModeler 5: Symbolic Parametric Simulation, Modular Reconfigurability and 200 New Built-in Components

July 25, 2017
Roger Germundsson, Director of Research & Development
Jan Brugård, CEO, Wolfram MathCore
Patrik Ekenberg, Applications Engineer, Wolfram MathCore

New in SystemModeler

Our goal with SystemModeler is to provide a state-of-the-art environment for modeling, simulation—and analytics—that leverages the Wolfram technology stack and builds on the Modelica standard for systems description (that we helped to develop).

SystemModeler is routinely used by the world’s engineering organizations on some of the world’s most complex engineering systems—as well as in fields such as life sciences and social science. We’ve been pursuing the development of what is now SystemModeler for more than 15 years, adding more and more sophistication to the capabilities of the system. And today we’re pleased to announce the latest step forward: SystemModeler 5.

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Stephen Wolfram

The Practical Business of Ontology: A Tale from the Front Lines

July 19, 2017 — Stephen Wolfram

The Philosophy of Chemicals

“We’ve just got to decide: is a chemical like a city or like a number?” I spent my day yesterday—as I have for much of the past 30 years—designing new features of the Wolfram Language. And yesterday afternoon one of my meetings was a fast-paced discussion about how to extend the chemistry capabilities of the language.

At some level the problem we were discussing was quintessentially practical. But as so often turns out to be the case for things we do, it ultimately involves some deep intellectual issues. And to actually get the right answer—and to successfully design language features that will stand the test of time—we needed to plumb those depths, and talk about things that usually wouldn’t be considered outside of some kind of philosophy seminar.

Thinker

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John Moore

Books from around the (Wolfram) World!

July 7, 2017 — John Moore, Marketing and Technical Content Team Lead

We’re always excited to see what new things people have created using Wolfram technologies. As the broad geographical distribution of Wolfram Community contributors illustrates, people all over the world are doing great things with the Wolfram Language. In this vein, today we want to highlight some recent books written in languages other than English that utilize Wolfram technologies. From engineering to statistics, these books provide valuable information for those looking to dig a little deeper into scientific applications of the Wolfram Language.

Recent Mathematica books

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Posted in: Books

Swede White

Analyzing Social Networks of Colonial Boston Revolutionaries with the Wolfram Language

June 29, 2017 — Swede White, Media & Communications Specialist

Revolutionary social networks lead image

As the Fourth of July approaches, many in America will celebrate 241 years since the founders of the United States of America signed the Declaration of Independence, their very own disruptive, revolutionary startup. Prior to independence, colonists would celebrate the birth of the king. However, after the Revolutionary War broke out in April of 1775, some colonists began holding mock funerals of King George III. Additionally, bonfires, celebratory cannon and musket fire and parades were common, along with public readings of the Declaration of Independence. There was also rum.

Today, we often celebrate with BBQ, fireworks and a host of other festivities. As an aspiring data nerd and a sociologist, I thought I would use the Wolfram Language to explore the Declaration of Independence using some basic natural language processing.

Using metadata, I’ll also explore a political network of colonists with particular attention paid to Paul Revere, using built-in Wolfram Language functions and network science to uncover some hidden truths about colonial Boston and its key players leading up to the signing of the Declaration of Independence.

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