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Unlocking New Computational Worlds with Textbooks Featuring Wolfram Technologies Calculus, Chemical Engineering, Natural Resource Economics and Beyond!

Technology is an increasingly important part of education, not just for pedagogical purposes, but also as a bridge to the real-world work students will experience as they enter nearly any given industry beyond the classroom. Mathematica’s ease of use and the flexibility of the Wolfram Language feature in several recent textbooks, ranging from within applied mathematics, such as differential equations, to physical sciences like chemical engineering. We’re pleased to share our conversations with two authors whose works cover that range, and to highlight other recent releases featuring Wolfram technology.
Announcements & Events

New in 13: Symbolic & Numeric Computation

Math is big, and math is important. And for the Wolfram Language (which also means for Mathematica) we’re always pushing the frontiers of what’s computable in math.

One long-term story has to do with special functions. Back in Version 1.0 we already had 70 special functions.

Best of Blog

Learn Linear Algebra in Five Hours Today with the Wolfram Language!

Linear algebra is probably the easiest and the most useful branch of modern mathematics. Indeed, topics such as matrices and linear equations are often taught in middle or high school. On the other hand, concepts and techniques from linear algebra underlie cutting-edge disciplines such as data science and quantum computation. And in the field of numerical analysis, everything is linear algebra!

Today, I am proud to announce a free interactive course, Introduction to Linear Algebra, that will help students all over the world to master this wonderful subject. The course uses the powerful functions for matrix operations in the Wolfram Language and addresses questions such as "How long would it take to solve a system of 500 linear equations?" or "How does data compression work?"

Education & Academic

Centenary of Bohr’s Atomic Theory (1913–2013)

I had intended to write a treatise describing the history of the hydrogen atom over the last 100 years. Unfortunately, my time is running out this year, so I will content myself instead with this much briefer blog post outlining the major events associated with Niels Bohr's three epochal papers in 1913. The hydrogen atom has been the most fundamental application at each level in the advancement of quantum theory. It is the only real physical system that can be solved exactly (although some might argue that this is also true for the radiation field, as an assembly of harmonic oscillators).
Education & Academic

The Student Perspective: Wolfram Summer School 2022

For the past 20 years, Stephen Wolfram has hosted the annual Wolfram Summer School: four weeks of intensive mentorship and teamwork and the completion of computational and research projects on a variety of topics, ranging from pure math to humanities, engineering, physics and more. Students from all over the world participate in Socratic classroom discussions, lecture series, casual networking events and coding sessions to help them design and complete original projects.
Education & Academic

Splitting a Point with Mathematica and MathTensor: A Mathematica Memoir

In the past few years, there have been many significant anniversaries in the Mathematica world. This has made me think about my long personal history working with all things Mathematica. Here I present an account of how I got involved with this world, developed my part of it and continue to use it. I show what I think is a unique application that differs from the other thousands of applications in Mathematica or the Wolfram Language presented on the various Wolfram Research websites, Wolfram Community and elsewhere. Finally, I attempt to describe the physics of what I do. The beginning historical part with much name-dropping can be skipped for those who want to read only about technical or physics issues.
Announcements & Events

Launching Version 13.0 of Wolfram Language + Mathematica

The March of Innovation Continues

Just a few weeks ago it was 1/3 of a century since Mathematica 1.0 was released. Today I’m excited to announce the latest results of our long-running R&D pipeline: Version 13 of Wolfram Language and Mathematica. (Yes, the 1, 3 theme—complete with the fact that it’s the 13th of the month today—is amusing, if coincidental.)

It’s 207 days—or a little over 6 months—since we released Version 12.3. And I’m pleased to say that in that short time an impressive amount of R&D has come to fruition: not only a total of 117 completely new functions, but also many hundreds of updated and upgraded functions, several thousand bug fixes and small enhancements, and a host of new ideas to make the system ever easier and smoother to use.

Every day, every week, every month for the past third of a century we’ve been pushing hard to add more to the vast integrated framework that is Mathematica and the Wolfram Language. And now we can see the results of all those individual ideas and projects and pieces of work: a steady drumbeat of innovation sustained now over the course of more than a third of a century:

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