June 22, 2017 — Andrew Steinacher, Wolfram|Alpha Developer, Wolfram|Alpha Scientific Content

Completed reportPlot 3D animation

When I first started driving in high school, I had to pay for my own gas. Since I was also saving for college, I had to be careful about my spending, so I started manually tracking how much I was paying for gas in a spreadsheet and calculating how much gas I was using. Whenever I filled my tank, I kept the receipts and wrote down how many miles I’d traveled and how many gallons I’d used. Every few weeks, I would manually enter all of this information into the spreadsheet and plot out the costs and the amount of fuel I had used. This process helped me both visualize how much money I was spending on fuel and manage my budget.

Once I got to college, however, I got a more fuel-efficient car and my schedule got a lot busier, so I didn’t have the time to track my fuel consumption like this anymore. Now I work at Wolfram Research and I’m still really busy, but the cool thing is that I can use our company technology to more easily accomplish my automotive assessments.

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June 6, 2017 — Keiko Hirayama, Wolfram|Alpha Developer, Wolfram|Alpha Scientific Content

Brain image and brain flow graph

As the next phase of Wolfram Research’s endeavor to make biology computable, we are happy to announce the recent release of neuroscience-related content.

The most central part of the human nervous system is the brain. It contains roughly 100 billion neurons that act together to process information, subdivided functionally and structurally into areas specialized for certain tasks. The brain’s anatomy, the characteristics of neurons and cognitive maps are used to represent some key aspects of the functional organization and processing abilities of our nervous system. Our new neuroscience content will give you a sneak peek into the amazing world of neuroscience with some facts about brains, neurons and cognition.

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June 2, 2017 — Michael Gammon, Blog Coordinator, Document and Media Systems

We’re always excited to see new books that illustrate applications of Wolfram technology in a wide range of fields. Below is another set of recently published books using the Wolfram Language to explore computational thinking. From André Dauphiné’s outstanding geographical studies of our planet to Romano and Caveliere’s work on the geometric optics that help us study the stars, we find a variety of fields served by Wolfram technology.

Application Books Set 1

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May 25, 2017 — Devendra Kapadia, Kernel Developer, Algorithms R&D

Calculus mathematician timeline

Derivatives of functions play a fundamental role in calculus and its applications. In particular, they can be used to study the geometry of curves, solve optimization problems and formulate differential equations that provide mathematical models in areas such as physics, chemistry, biology and finance. The function D computes derivatives of various types in the Wolfram Language and is one of the most-used functions in the system. My aim in writing this post is to introduce you to the exciting new features for D in Version 11.1, starting with a brief history of derivatives.

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May 23, 2017 — Jeffrey Bryant, Research Programmer, Wolfram|Alpha Scientific Content

Sun, TRAPPIST, Jupiter and Mercury with exoplanet orbit

Exoplanets are currently an active area of research in astronomy. In the past few years, the number of exoplanet discoveries has exploded, mainly as the result of the Kepler mission to survey eclipsing exoplanet systems. But Kepler isn’t the only exoplanet study mission going on. For example, the TRAnsiting Planets and PlanetesImals Small Telescope (TRAPPIST) studies its own set of targets. In fact, the media recently focused on an exoplanet system orbiting an obscure star known as TRAPPIST-1. As an introduction to exoplanet systems, we’ll explore TRAPPIST-1 and its system of exoplanets using the Wolfram Language.

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May 17, 2017 — Itai Seggev, Mathematica Algorithm R&D

WolframScript

Calling all command-line junkies: the new WolframScript is here!

Now you can evaluate Wolfram Language code, call deployed APIs and execute standalone scripts directly from your favorite command-line interface. WolframScript works like any other command-line utility, enabling flexible connections between the Wolfram System and other programs and I/O.

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April 20, 2017 — Stephen Wolfram

After a Decade, It’s Finally Here!

I’m pleased to announce that as of today, the Wolfram Data Repository is officially launched! It’s been a long road. I actually initiated the project a decade ago—but it’s only now, with all sorts of innovations in the Wolfram Language and its symbolic ways of representing data, as well as with the arrival of the Wolfram Cloud, that all the pieces are finally in place to make a true computable data repository that works the way I think it should.

Wolfram Data Respository

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April 11, 2017 — Swede White, Media & Communications Specialist

Walking the dog

It’s National Pet Day on April 11, the day we celebrate furry, feathered or otherwise nonhuman companions. To commemorate the date, we thought we’d use some new features in the Wolfram Language to map a dog walk using pictures taken with a smartphone along the way. After that, we’ll use some neural net functions to identify the content in the photos. One of the great things about Wolfram Language 11.1 is pre-trained neural nets, including Inception V3 trained on ImageNet Competition data and Inception V1 trained on Places365 data, among others, making it super easy for a novice programmer to implement them. These two pre-trained neural nets make it easy to: 1) identify objects in images; and 2) tell a user what sort of landscape an image represents.

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April 7, 2017 — Håkan Wettergren, Applications Engineer, SystemModeler (MathCore)

Making tone with wine glass

Vibration measurement is an important tool for fault detection in rotating machinery. In a previous post, “How to Use Your Smartphone for Vibration Analysis, Part 1: The Wolfram Language,” I described how you can perform a vibration analysis with a smartphone and Mathematica. Here, I will show how this technique can be improved upon using the Wolfram Cloud. One advantage with this is that I don’t need to bring my laptop.

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March 16, 2017 — Stephen Wolfram

A Minor Release That’s Not Minor

I’m pleased to announce the release today of Version 11.1 of the Wolfram Language (and Mathematica). As of now, Version 11.1 is what’s running in the Wolfram Cloud—and desktop versions are available for immediate download for Mac, Windows and Linux.

What’s new in Version 11.1? Well, actually a remarkable amount. Here’s a summary:

Summary of new features

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