December 3, 2014 — Adriana O'Brien, Business Development, Partnerships

Get ready, get set… code! It’s the time of year to get thinking about programming with the Hour of Code.

For many years, Wolfram Research has promoted and supported initiatives that encourage computation, programming, and STEM education, and we are always thrilled when efforts are taken by others to do the same. Code.org, in conjunction with Computer Science Education Week, is sponsoring an event to encourage educators and organizations across the country to dedicate a single hour to coding. This hour gives kids (and adults, too!) a taste of what it means to study computer science—and how it can actually be a creative, fun, and fulfilling process. Millions of students participated in the Hour of Code in past years, and instructors are looking for more engaging activities for their students to try. Enter the Wolfram Language.

Built into the Wolfram Language is the technology from Wolfram|Alpha that enables natural language input—and lets students create code just by writing English.

W|A using natural language

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September 24, 2014 — Jamie Peterson, Technical Programs Manager

Following one of our most anticipated releases to date, we hosted the virtual workshop Wolfram Experts Live: New in Mathematica 10 to give the Wolfram community the details on this latest version of our flagship product Mathematica.

Mathematica 10

A dozen Wolfram experts and Mathematica developers came together at our headquarters—both in person and remotely via online connections—to take turns showing off new advances in usability, algorithmic functionality, and integration with the Wolfram Cloud. Presenters participated in a live Q&A with the online audience, and in turn were able to hear from Mathematica users and enthusiasts.

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August 7, 2014 — Jeffrey Bryant, Scientific Information Group

We are reposting this blog post due to the ESA’s success yesterday, August 6, 2014.

We recently posted a blog entry celebrating the anniversary of the Apollo 11 landing on the Moon. Now, just a couple weeks later, we are preparing for another first: the European Space Agency’s attempt to orbit and then land on a comet. The Rosetta spacecraft was launched in 2004 with the ultimate goal of orbiting and landing on comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko. Since the launch, Rosetta has already flown by asteroid Steins, in 2008, and asteroid 21 Lutetia, in 2010.

NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA) have a long history of sending probes to other solar system bodies that then orbit those bodies. The bodies have usually been nice, well-behaved, and spherical, making orbital calculations a fairly standard thing. But, as Rosetta recently started to approach comet 67P, we began to get our first views of this alien world. And it is far from spherical.

Far from spherical comet 67P

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August 1, 2014 — Arnoud Buzing, Director of Quality and Release Management

Earlier this month we released Mathematica 10, a major update to Wolfram’s flagship desktop product. It contains over 700 new functions and improvements to just about every part of the system.

Mathematica + Raspberry Pi

Today I’m happy to announce an update for Mathematica and the Wolfram Language for the Raspberry Pi that brings those new features to the Raspberry Pi. To get the new version of the Wolfram Language, simply run this command in a terminal on your Raspberry Pi:

sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get install wolfram-engine

This new version will also be pre-installed in the next release of NOOBS, the easy setup system for the Raspberry Pi.

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June 23, 2014 — Stephen Wolfram

Twenty-six years ago today we launched Mathematica 1.0. And I am excited that today we have what I think is another historic moment: the launch of Wolfram Programming Cloud—the first in a sequence of products based on the new Wolfram Language.

Wolfram Programming Cloud

My goal with the Wolfram Language in general—and Wolfram Programming Cloud in particular—is to redefine the process of programming, and to automate as much as possible, so that once a human can express what they want to do with sufficient clarity, all the details of how it is done should be handled automatically.

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March 25, 2014 — Stephen Wolfram

Two weeks ago I spoke at SXSW Interactive in Austin, TX. Here’s a slightly edited transcript (it’s the “speaker’s cut”, including some demos I had to abandon during the talk):

Well, I’ve got a lot planned for this hour.

Basically, I want to tell you a story that’s been unfolding for me for about the last 40 years, and that’s just coming to fruition in a really exciting way. And by just coming to fruition, I mean pretty much today. Because I’m planning to show you today a whole lot of technology that’s the result of that 40-year story—that I’ve never shown before, and that I think is going to be pretty important.

I always like to do live demos. But today I’m going to be pretty extreme. Showing you a lot of stuff that’s very very fresh. And I hope at least a decent fraction of it is going to work.

OK, here’s the big theme: taking computation seriously. Really understanding the idea of computation. And then building technology that lets one inject it everywhere—and then seeing what that means.

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