October 4, 2017 — John Fultz, Director of User Interface Technology

Ten months ago, I announced the beginning of our open beta program for Wolfram Player for iOS. The beta is over, and we are now shipping Wolfram Player in the App Store. Wolfram Player for iOS joins Wolfram CDF Player on Windows, Mac and Linux as a free platform for sharing your notebook content with the world.

Wolfram Player

Wolfram Player is the first native computational notebook experience ever on iOS. You can now take your notebooks with you and play them offline. Wolfram Player supports notebooks running interfaces backed by Version 11.1 of the Wolfram Language—an 11.2 release will come shortly. Wolfram Player includes the same kernel that you would find in any desktop or cloud release of the Wolfram Language.

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June 22, 2017 — Andrew Steinacher, Wolfram|Alpha Developer, Wolfram|Alpha Scientific Content

Completed reportPlot 3D animation

When I first started driving in high school, I had to pay for my own gas. Since I was also saving for college, I had to be careful about my spending, so I started manually tracking how much I was paying for gas in a spreadsheet and calculating how much gas I was using. Whenever I filled my tank, I kept the receipts and wrote down how many miles I’d traveled and how many gallons I’d used. Every few weeks, I would manually enter all of this information into the spreadsheet and plot out the costs and the amount of fuel I had used. This process helped me both visualize how much money I was spending on fuel and manage my budget.

Once I got to college, however, I got a more fuel-efficient car and my schedule got a lot busier, so I didn’t have the time to track my fuel consumption like this anymore. Now I work at Wolfram Research and I’m still really busy, but the cool thing is that I can use our company technology to more easily accomplish my automotive assessments.

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April 27, 2017 — Brett Haines, Junior Release Engineer

Raspberry Pi with Sense HAT

Ever since the partnership between the Raspberry Pi Foundation and Wolfram Research began, people have been excited to discover—and are often surprised by—the power and ease of using the Wolfram Language on a Raspberry Pi. The Wolfram Language’s utility is expanded even more with the addition of the Sense HAT, a module that gives the Raspberry Pi access to an LED array and a collection of environmental and movement sensors. This gives users the ability to read in data from the physical world and display or manipulate it in the Wolfram Language with simple, one-line functions. With the release of Mathematica 11, I’ve been working hard to refine functions that connect to the Sense HAT, allowing Mathematica to communicate directly with the device.

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April 7, 2017 — Håkan Wettergren, Applications Engineer, SystemModeler (MathCore)

Making tone with wine glass

Vibration measurement is an important tool for fault detection in rotating machinery. In a previous post, “How to Use Your Smartphone for Vibration Analysis, Part 1: The Wolfram Language,” I described how you can perform a vibration analysis with a smartphone and Mathematica. Here, I will show how this technique can be improved upon using the Wolfram Cloud. One advantage with this is that I don’t need to bring my laptop.

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January 3, 2017 — John Moore, Marketing and Technical Content Team Lead

Story image collage

It’s been a busy year here at the Wolfram Blog. We’ve written about ways to avoid the UK’s most unhygienic foods, exciting new developments in mathematics and even how you can become a better Pokémon GO player. Here are some of our most popular stories from the year.

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September 19, 2016 — Conrad Wolfram, Strategic Director

Today I’m pleased to announce Wolfram Enterprise Private Cloud (EPC), which takes the unique benefits of the Wolfram technology stack—ultimate computation, integrated language and deployment—and makes them available in a centralized, private, secure enterprise solution.

In essence, EPC enables you to put computation at the heart of your infrastructure and in turn deliver a complete enterprise computation solution for your organization.

EPC diagram

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September 21, 2015 — Arnoud Buzing, Director of Quality and Release Management

I drink too much coffee—it’s one of my few vices. Recently, my favorite espresso machine at the Wolfram Research headquarters in Champaign, Illinois, was replaced with a fancy new combination coffee and espresso maker. The coffee now comes in little pouches of various flavors, ranging from “light and smooth” to “dark and intense”. There even is a “hot chocolate” pouch and a way to make cappuccinos using both a “froth” pouch and an “espresso” pouch. Here is a picture of the new coffee selection:

Coffee flavor display

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April 28, 2015 — Stephen Wolfram

My goal with the Wolfram Language is to take programming to a new level. And over the past year we’ve been rolling out ways to use and deploy the language in many places—desktop, cloud, mobile, embedded, etc. So what about wearables? And in particular, what about the Apple Watch? A few days ago I decided to explore what could be done. So I cleared my schedule for the day, and started writing code.

My idea was to write code with our standard Wolfram Programming Cloud, but instead of producing a web app or web API, to produce an app for the Apple Watch. And conveniently enough, a preliminary version of our Wolfram Cloud app just became available in the App Store—letting me deploy from the Wolfram Cloud to both mobile devices and the watch.

A few lines of Wolfram Language code creates and deploys an Apple Watch app

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April 16, 2015 — Stephen Wolfram

The Wolfram Cloud Needs to Be Perfect

The Wolfram Cloud is coming out of beta soon (yay!), and right now I’m spending much of my time working to make it as good as possible (and, by the way, it’s getting to be really great!). Mostly I concentrate on defining high-level function and strategy. But I like to understand things at every level, and as a CEO, one’s ultimately responsible for everything. And at the beginning of March I found myself diving deep into something I never expected…

Here’s the story. As a serious production system that lots of people will use to do things like run businesses, the Wolfram Cloud should be as fast as possible. Our metrics were saying that typical speeds were good, but subjectively when I used it something felt wrong. Sometimes it was plenty fast, but sometimes it seemed way too slow.

We’ve got excellent software engineers, but months were going by, and things didn’t seem to be changing. Meanwhile, we’d just released the Wolfram Data Drop. So I thought, why don’t I just run some tests myself, maybe collecting data in our nice new Wolfram Data Drop?

A great thing about the Wolfram Language is how friendly it is for busy people: even if you only have time to dash off a few lines of code, you can get real things done. And in this case, I only had to run three lines of code to find a problem.

First, I deployed a web API for a trivial Wolfram Language program to the Wolfram Cloud:

In[1]:= CloudDeploy[APIFunction[{}, 1 &]]

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January 22, 2015 — Wolfram Blog Team

Draw Anything, an iOS app designed and created by Olivia Walch and Matt Jacobs, was the winning hack at the recent MHacks V. Utilizing the power of Wolfram Programming Cloud, the two Draw Anything hackers came out on top after a fierce competition between more than 250 talented teams, made up of 1,200 hackers representing over 100 universities. Students from around the world came to learn, network, and “spend 36 hours building anything they can imagine.”

MHacks V winners: Draw Anything team, Olivia Walch and Matt Jacobs

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