November 4, 2016 — Zach Littrell, Technical Content Writer, Technical Communications and Strategy Group

Here are just a handful of things I heard while attending my first Wolfram Technology Conference:

  • “We had a nearly 4-billion-time speedup on this code example.”
  • “We’ve worked together for over 9 years, and now we’re finally meeting!”
  • “Coding in the Wolfram Language is like collaborating with 200 or 300 experts.”
  • “You can turn financial data into rap music. Instead, how about we turn rap music into financial data?”

As a first-timer from the Wolfram Blog Team attending the Technology Conference, I wanted to share with you some of the highlights for me—making new friends, watching Wolfram Language experts code and seeing what the Wolfram family has been up to around the world this past year.

Images from the 2016 Wolfram Tech Conference

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September 30, 2016 — John McGee, Applications Developer, Wolfram Technology Group


A Mersenne prime is a prime number of the form Mp = 2p – 1, where the exponent p must also be prime. These primes take their name from the French mathematician and religious scholar Marin Mersenne, who produced a list of primes of this form in the first half of the seventeenth century. It has been known since antiquity that the first four of these, M2 = 3, M3 = 7,
M5 = 31 and M7 = 127, are prime.

Marin Mersenne

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August 26, 2016 — Zach Littrell, Technical Content Writer, Technical Communications and Strategy Group

We are constantly surprised by what fascinating applications and topics Wolfram Language experts are writing about, and we’re happy to again share with you some of these amazing authors’ works. With topics ranging from learning to use the Wolfram Language on a Raspberry Pi to a groundbreaking book with a novel approach to calculations, you are bound to find a publication perfect for your interests.

Getting Started with Wolfram Language and Mathematica for Raspberry Pi, Essentials of Programming in Mathematica, Geospatial Algebraic Computations, Theory and Applications

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July 14, 2016 — Connor Flood, Consultant, Wolfram|Alpha Math Content

An idea, some initiative, and great resources allowed me to design and create the world’s first online syntax-free proof generator using induction, which recently went live on Wolfram|Alpha.

Induction-based proof generator on Wolfram|Alpha

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July 6, 2016 — Zach Littrell, Technical Content Writer, Technical Communications and Strategy Group

The population of Wolfram Language speakers around the globe has only grown since the language’s inception almost thirty years ago, and we always enjoy discovering users and authors who share their passion for Wolfram technologies in their own languages. So in this post, we are highlighting foreign-language books around the world that utilize Wolfram technologies, from a mathematical toolbox in Japanese to an introduction on bioinformatics from Germany.

Basic Mathematica Primer; Mathematica Basic Training Course; Mathematica-Based Digital Physics

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May 19, 2016 — Michael Trott, Chief Scientist

Blog communicated on behalf of Jean-Charles de Borda.

Some thoughts for World Metrology Day 2016

Please allow me to introduce myself
I’m a man of precision and science
I’ve been around for a long, long time
Stole many a man’s pound and toise
And I was around when Louis XVI
Had his moment of doubt and pain
Made damn sure that metric rules
Through platinum standards made forever
Pleased to meet you
Hope you guess my name

Introduction and about me

In case you can’t guess: I am Jean-Charles de Borda, sailor, mathematician, scientist, and member of the Académie des Sciences, born on May 4, 1733, in Dax, France. Two weeks ago would have been my 283rd birthday. This is me:

Jean-Charles de Borda

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May 16, 2016
Oleg Marichev, Integration & Special Function Developer, Wolfram|Alpha Scientific Content
Yury Brychkov, Consultant, Wolfram|Alpha Scientific Content

Nearly two hundred years after Friedrich Bessel introduced his eponymous functions, expressions for their derivatives with respect to parameters, valid over the double complex plane, have been found.

In this blog we will show and briefly discuss some formerly unknown derivatives of special functions (primarily Bessel and related functions), and explore the history and current status of differentiation by parameters of hypergeometric and other functions. One of the main formulas found (more details below) is a closed form for the first derivative of one of the most popular special functions, the Bessel function J:

The first derivative of the Bessel J function with respect to its parameter

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April 7, 2016 — Wolfram Blog Team

Authors that choose to incorporate Wolfram technologies into their books are practitioners in a variety of STEM fields. Their work is an invaluable resource of information about the application of Mathematica, the Wolfram Language, and other Wolfram technologies for hobbyists, STEM professionals, and students.

Handbook of Mathematics, sixth edition; Advanced Calculus Using Mathematica: Notebook Edition; Handbook of Linear Partial Differential Equations for Engineers and Scientists, second edition

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September 10, 2015 — Ed Pegg Jr, Editor, Wolfram Demonstrations Project

The Glencoe Algebra II study materials (p. 10) make an amazing claim (Reddit).

Glencoe Algebra II excerpt

This statement is in a math textbook, but it is horrifyingly wrong. A statement like “the letters A–Z cannot be matched up with the numbers 1–26″ would be similarly wrong. These two sets of the same size (here, 26) can be matched up as A1, B2, C3, …, Z26. Can the rational numbers be matched up with the integers? Both are infinite, which allows for the tricks of a technique called Hilbert’s hotel, a hotel with infinite numbered rooms that can always make room for one more guest. The Glencoe claim asks if the cardinality of the integers and rationals is the same. Both are Aleph-O, or Aleph-0, which Georg Cantor proved in the 1870s.

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July 2, 2015 — Jenna Giuffrida, Content Administrator, Technical Communications and Strategy Group

We’re always on the lookout for new ideas and ways of using the Wolfram Language that our users produce and choose to write about in their books. In this quarter, we have applications that bridge the gap between art and geometry, and demonstrate intuitive data analysis. In addition to writing books, Wolfram welcomes authors to submit articles for publication in The Mathematica Journal, our very own in-house periodical.

A Primer of NMR Theory with Calculations Using Mathematica;  Clojure Data Analysis Cookbook, Second Edition; Geometric Design, An artful Portfolio of Mathematical Graphics; Extension of Mathematica System Functionality

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