May 20, 2015 — Ed Pegg Jr, Editor, Wolfram Demonstrations Project

In many areas of mathematics, 1 is the answer. Squaring a number above or below 1 results in a new number that is larger or smaller. Sometimes, determining whether something is “big” is based on whether a largest dimension is greater than 1. For instance, with sides of length 13,800 km, Saturn’s hexagon would be considered big. A “little polygon” is defined as a polygon where 1 is the maximum distance between vertices. In 1975, Ron Graham found the biggest little hexagon, which has more area than the regular hexagon, as shown below. The red diagonals have length 1. All other diagonals (not drawn) are smaller than 1.

Regular hexagon, biggest little hexagon, biggest little octagon showing lengths of 1

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April 21, 2015 — Jenna Giuffrida, Content Administrator, Technical Communications and Strategy Group

What do genealogy, linear algebra, and the Raspberry Pi have in common? Not much, but they come together in this diverse and engaging assortment of books by the international community of authors employing Wolfram technologies in their work.

Raspberry Pi for Dummies, Ordinary Differential Equations, Special Integrals of Gradshteyn and Ryzhik, Applied Differential Equations

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March 12, 2015 — Stephen Wolfram

Pictures from Pi Day now added »

This coming Saturday is “Pi Day of the Century”. The date 3/14/15 in month/day/year format is like the first digits of And at 9:26:53.589… it’s a “super pi moment”.

3/14/15 9:26:53.589... a "super pi moment" indeed

Between Mathematica and , I’m pretty sure our company has delivered more π to the world than any other organization in history. So of course we have to do something special for Pi Day of the Century.

Pi Day of the Century with Wolfram: 3.14.15 9:26:53

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February 20, 2015 — Hector Zenil, Special Projects Group

When I was invited to join the Turing Centenary Advisory Committee in 2008 by Professor Barry Cooper to prepare for the Alan Turing Year in 2012, I would have never imagined that just a few years later, Turing’s life and work would have gained sufficient public attention to become the subject of a Hollywood-style feature film, nor that said movie would go on to earn eight Oscar nominations.

Imitation game nominations using Wolfram|Alpha

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February 9, 2015 — Jenna Giuffrida, Content Administrator, Technical Communications and Strategy Group

We are once again thrilled by the wide variety of topics covered by authors around the world using Wolfram technologies to write their books and explore their disciplines. These latest additions range from covering the basics for students to working within specialties like continuum mechanics.

Books

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January 15, 2015 — Oleksandr Pavlyk, Kernel Technology

January 16, 2015, marks the 360th birthday anniversary of Jacob Bernoulli (also James, or Jacques).

Input 1 through Output 4

Jacob Bernoulli was the first mathematician in the Bernoulli family, which produced many notable mathematicians of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.

Jacob Bernoulli’s mathematical legacy is rich. He introduced Bernoulli numbers, solved the Bernoulli differential equation, studied the Bernoulli trials process, proved the Bernoulli inequality, discovered the number e, and demonstrated the weak law of large numbers (Bernoulli’s theorem).

Jacob Bernoulli's mathematical achievements

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October 21, 2014 — Ed Pegg Jr, Editor, Wolfram Demonstrations Project

For today’s magic show:
A century ago,
Martin Gardner was born in Oklahoma.
He philosophized for his diploma.
He wrote on Hex and Tic-Tac-Toe.
The Icosian game and polyomino.
Flexagons from paper trim,
Samuel Loyd, the game of Nim.
Digital roots and Soma stairs,
mazes, logic, magic squares.
Squaring squares, the golden Phi.
Solved the spider and the fly.
Martin GardnerPenrose Tilings and Wieringa Roofs
Tiling with PentominosHamiltonian Tours on Polyhedra

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October 6, 2014 — Jenna Giuffrida, Content Administrator, Technical Communications and Strategy Group

Authors turn to Wolfram technologies to elucidate complex concepts, from physics to finance. Here is a roundup of the latest publications that feature the Wolfram Language and Mathematica.

New books group #1

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October 1, 2014 — Richard Asher, Public Relations

The Nobel Prize in Physics ceremony is upon us once again! With the 2014 winner set to be revealed in Stockholm next week, we at Wolfram got to wondering how many of the past recipients have been Mathematica users.

We found no less than 10 Nobel Prize–winning physicists who personally registered copies of Mathematica. That’s at least one in every eight Physics laureates since 1980! And anecdotal evidence suggests that nearly every Nobel laureate uses Mathematica through their institution’s site license.

Frank Wilczek Wolfgang Ketterle John Forbes Nash, Jr.

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August 12, 2014 — Stephen Wolfram

Every four years for more than a century there’s been an International Congress of Mathematicians (ICM) held somewhere in the world. In 1900 it was where David Hilbert announced his famous collection of math problems—and it’s remained the top single periodic gathering for the world’s research mathematicians.

This year the ICM is in Seoul, and I’m going to it today. I went to the ICM once before—in Kyoto in 1990. Mathematica was only two years old then, and mathematicians were just getting used to it. Plenty already used it extensively—but at the ICM there were also quite a few who said, “I do pure mathematics. How can Mathematica possibly help me?”

Mathematics

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