March 4, 2014 — Wolfram Blog Team

As an instructor at the School of Architecture Paris-Malaquais, Maurizio Brocato chooses to use Mathematica because he finds alternative solutions “less complete.” Only Mathematica incorporates the requisite image, logic, and mathematics functionality into one platform.

Brocato teaches his doctoral students the importance of understanding formal and fundamental viewpoints, and his goal is to prepare them to collaborate across disciplines with others in the field of engineering.

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January 16, 2014 — Wolfram Blog Team

Just how big were the dinosaurs? Dr. Nathan Myhrvold recently published a paper challenging our mainstream understanding of these massive creatures’ size.

Tyrannosaurus

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January 10, 2014 — Wolfram Blog Team

Researchers and professionals from around the world are frequently using Mathematica to further their fields of study. We like to recognize these published books and papers that incorporate our technologies and catalog them so that you can find resources for using Mathematica in subjects you need. Here are some recent publications:

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December 23, 2013 — Wolfram Blog Team

Disney Animated was just selected by Apple as the Best iPad App of 2013! Congratulations to Theodore Gray—one of the co-founders of our company—and Touch Press, a company incubated at Wolfram Research!

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November 18, 2013 — Wolfram Blog Team

Wolfram Research hosted the annual Technology Conference at our headquarters in Champaign, Illinois, October 21–23. We welcomed over two hundred attendees from twenty different countries, making this our largest turnout yet!

The event was once again jam-packed with exciting talks, Q&As, workshops, and even hands-on time with some of our top-secret upcoming products. (Sorry, but you had to be there to find out what they are—all attendees signed a Nondisclosure Agreement in order to hear the latest about our unreleased technologies!) We enjoyed a stellar opening keynote from Stephen Wolfram, which left everyone buzzing with anticipation for the sessions and speakers to follow.

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August 13, 2013 — Theodore Gray, Co-founder, Wolfram Research, Inc; Founder, Touch Press; Proprietor, periodictable.com

I just finished giving a short presentation to several thousand screaming fans at the D23 Disney fan convention in Anaheim, California. When I say “screaming fans,” what I mean is Disney fans who were literally screaming at what I had to say.

This already somewhat improbable situation was made all the more surprising by the fact that they were screaming about FindClusters.

Well, technically, most of them may not have actually realized that’s what they were screaming about, because they were seeing only the output of the command, not the actual Mathematica code. But the thing they were so excited about was direct output from Mathematica, and the key differentiating factor that made it so interesting to them was the ability of FindClusters to discern, differentiate, and illuminate the shifting moods and emotions of animated feature films.

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August 5, 2013 — Crystal Fantry, Manager, Education Content

Thirty-three extremely intelligent high school students gathered at Bentley University July 7-19 to participate in our second annual Mathematica Summer Camp. The program lasted two weeks, and within this small window of time, students created their very own Mathematica projects. At the end of the camp, students presented these projects to their peers, camp instructors, and Stephen Wolfram. Projects ranged from games created in Mathematica to a Demonstration of the “Wavefunction and Probability Density of a Coupled Quantum Harmonic Oscillator.” These projects will be posted to the Wolfram Demonstrations Project here, adding to the great work of those from 2012!

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June 23, 2013 — Stephen Wolfram

Today it’s exactly a quarter of a century since we launched Mathematica 1.0 on June 23, 1988. Much has come and gone in the world of computing since that time. But I’m pleased to say that through all of it Mathematica has just kept getting stronger and stronger.

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June 20, 2013 — Wolfram Blog Team

Have an interest in mathematics or science? Wolfram technologies like Mathematica and the Computable Document Format (CDF) are bringing us to the next level of educational experience through top-notch publishing environments and interactive course content from premier math and science leaders.

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June 6, 2013 — Stephen Wolfram

 

In a few weeks it’ll be 25 years ago: June 23, 1988—the day Mathematica was launched.

Late the night before we were still duplicating floppy disks and stuffing product boxes. But at noon on June 23 there I was at a conference center in Santa Clara starting up Mathematica in public for the first time:

Mathematica v1.0 on Macintosh

(Yes, that was the original startup screen, and yes, Mathematica 1.0 ran on Macs and various Unix workstation computers; PCs weren’t yet powerful enough.)

People were pretty excited to see what Mathematica could do. And there were pretty nice speeches about the promise of Mathematica from a spectrum of computer industry leaders, including Steve Jobs (then at NeXT), who was kind enough to come even though he hadn’t appeared in public for a while. And someone at the event had the foresight to get all the speakers to sign a copy of the book, which had just gone on sale that day at bookstores all over the country:

Signatures of speakers at release of Mathematica v1.0

So much has happened with Mathematica in the quarter century since then. What began with Mathematica 1.0 has turned into the vast system that is Mathematica today. And as I look at the 25th Anniversary Scrapbook, it makes me proud to see how many contributions Mathematica has made to invention, discovery and education:

The Mathematica Story: A Scrapbook

But to me what’s perhaps most satisfying is how the fundamental principles on which I built Mathematica have stood the test of time. And how the core ideas and language that were in Mathematica 1.0 persist today (and yes, most Mathematica 1.0 code will still run unchanged today).

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