March 8, 2018 — Stephen Wolfram

The Release Pipeline

Last September we released Version 11.2 of the Wolfram Language and Mathematica—with all sorts of new functionality, including 100+ completely new functions. Version 11.2 was a big release. But today we’ve got a still bigger release: Version 11.3 that, among other things, includes nearly 120 completely new functions.

This June 23rd it’ll be 30 years since we released Version 1.0, and I’m very proud of the fact that we’ve now been able to maintain an accelerating rate of innovation and development for no less than three decades. Critical to this, of course, has been the fact that we use the Wolfram Language to develop the Wolfram Language—and indeed most of the things that we can now add in Version 11.3 are only possible because we’re making use of the huge stack of technology that we’ve been systematically building for more than 30 years.

11.3We’ve always got a large pipeline of R&D underway, and our strategy for .1 versions is to use them to release everything that’s ready at a particular moment in time. Sometimes what’s in a .1 version may not completely fill out a new area, and some of the functions may be tagged as “experimental”. But our goal with .1 versions is to be able to deliver the latest fruits of our R&D efforts on as timely a basis as possible. Integer (.0) versions aim to be more systematic, and to provide full coverage of new areas, rounding out what has been delivered incrementally in .1 versions.

In addition to all the new functionality in 11.3, there’s a new element to our process. Starting a couple of months ago, we began livestreaming internal design review meetings that I held as we brought Version 11.3 to completion. So for those interested in “how the sausage is made”, there are now almost 122 hours of recorded meetings, from which you can find out exactly how some of the things you can now see released in Version 11.3 were originally invented. And in this post, I’m going to be linking to specific recorded livestreams relevant to features I’m discussing.

What’s New?

OK, so what’s new in Version 11.3? Well, a lot of things. And, by the way, Version 11.3 is available today on both desktop (Mac, Windows, Linux) and the Wolfram Cloud. (And yes, it takes extremely nontrivial software engineering, management and quality assurance to achieve simultaneous releases of this kind.)

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September 14, 2017 — Stephen Wolfram

Our Latest R&D Output

I’m excited today to announce the latest output from our R&D pipeline: Version 11.2 of the Wolfram Language and Mathematica—available immediately on desktop (Mac, Windows, Linux) and cloud.

It was only this spring that we released Version 11.1. But after the summer we’re now ready for another impressive release—with all kinds of additions and enhancements, including 100+ entirely new functions:

New functions word cloud

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May 17, 2017 — Itai Seggev, Mathematica Algorithm R&D


Calling all command-line junkies: the new WolframScript is here!

Now you can evaluate Wolfram Language code, call deployed APIs and execute standalone scripts directly from your favorite command-line interface. WolframScript works like any other command-line utility, enabling flexible connections between the Wolfram System and other programs and I/O.

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March 16, 2017 — Stephen Wolfram

A Minor Release That’s Not Minor

I’m pleased to announce the release today of Version 11.1 of the Wolfram Language (and Mathematica). As of now, Version 11.1 is what’s running in the Wolfram Cloud—and desktop versions are available for immediate download for Mac, Windows and Linux.

What’s new in Version 11.1? Well, actually a remarkable amount. Here’s a summary:

Summary of new features

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January 24, 2017 — Jeremy Sykes, Publishing Assistant, Wolfram Media

Hands-on Start cover

Jeremy Sykes: To celebrate the release of Hands-on Start to Wolfram Mathematica and Programming with the Wolfram Language (HOS2), now in its second edition, I sat down with the authors. Working with Cliff, Kelvin and Michael as the book’s production manager has been an easy and engaging process. I’m thrilled to see the second edition in print, particularly now in its smaller, more conveniently sized format.

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November 9, 2016 — Christopher Carlson, Senior User Interface Developer, User Interfaces

Could you fit the code for a fully functional game of Pong into a single tweet? One that gives you more points the more you take your chances in letting the “ball” escape? Philip Maymin did, and took first prize with that submission in the One-Liner Competition held at this year’s Wolfram Technology Conference.

Participants in the competition submit 128 or fewer tweetable characters of Wolfram Language code to perform the most impressive computation they can dream up. We had a bumper crop of entries this year that showed the surprising power of the Wolfram Language. You might think that after decades of experience creating and developing with the Wolfram Language, we at Wolfram Research would have seen and thought of it all. But every year our conference attendees surprise us. Read on to see the amazing effects you can achieve with a tweet of Wolfram Language code.

Honorable Mention
Amy Friedman: “The Song Titles” (110 characters)

Friedman's Submission

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September 26, 2016 — Lizzie Griffiths, Wolfram Research Europe Ltd.

Bonjour la France! This October, we’re coming to you to introduce Mathematica 11. We will be running three conferences across France, starting October 4.

Seminaire Mathematica

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August 8, 2016 — Stephen Wolfram

Note: There have been additional updates to Mathematica. Read about the updates in Version 11.1 and Version 11.2

I’m thrilled today to announce the release of a major new version of Mathematica and the Wolfram Language: Version 11, available immediately for both desktop and cloud. Hundreds of us have been energetically working on building this for the past two years—and in fact I’ve personally put several thousand hours into it. I’m very excited about what’s in it; it’s a major step forward, with a lot of both breadth and depth—and with remarkably central relevance to many of today’s most prominent technology areas.

Featured areas in Version 11 of Mathematica and the Wolfram Language

It’s been more than 28 years since Version 1 came out—and nearly 30 years since I started its development. And all that time I’ve been continuing to pursue a bold vision—and to build a taller and taller stack of technology. With most software, after a few years and a few versions, not a lot of important new stuff ever gets added. But with Mathematica and the Wolfram Language it’s been a completely different story: for three decades we’ve been taking major steps forward at every version, progressively conquering vast numbers of new areas.

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April 25, 2016 — Hy Nguyen, Consultant, Public Relations

April and Mathematics Awareness Month will soon be coming to an end, and so will these special offers on Mathematica and Wolfram|Alpha. As I mentioned in my last post, this year’s Mathematics Awareness Month explores “the Future of Prediction” via mathematics and statistics. Ever since the earliest recognition of mathematics, people have used it to make accurate predictions not only in math but also in related fields.

Math Awareness Month

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March 14, 2016 — Hy Nguyen, Consultant, Public Relations

Pi Day is celebrated on March 14 (3.14) every year to properly recognize the constant pi (π=~3.14159)—the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter. At Wolfram, π plays an important part in every one of our products, allowing users to do everything from getting the basic area of a circle to rendering a π symbol filled with the digits of π. On Pi Day last year (aka the Pi Day of the Century), the folks at SXSW got a very special treat from us in the name of π. This year, we decided to bring the celebration to you by offering exclusive discounts on Mathematica. Get 15% off Mathematica Home Edition and 25% or more off Mathematica Student Edition in select territories, including North and South America, Australia, and parts of Asia and Africa. Regardless of where you are, you can still celebrate with us by finding your Pi Day.

Pi Day Savings

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